Tarproxen tablets

Tarproxen

  • Active Ingredient: Naproxen
  • 500 mg, 250 mg
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What is Tarproxen?

The active ingredient of Tarproxen brand is naproxen. Naproxen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Naproxen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body. C14H14O3 M.W. 230.26 Naproxen has a molecular weight of 230.26 and a molecular formula of C14H14O3. Naproxen USP is an odorless, white to off-white crystalline substance powder. It is lipid-soluble, practically insoluble in water, soluable in alcohol and in methanol at low pH and freely soluble in water at high pH. The octanol/water partition coefficient of Naproxen at pH 7.4 is 1.6 to 1.8. Naproxen Oral Suspension USP for oral administration contains 125 mg Naproxen USP per 5 mL and the following inactive ingredients: FD&C Yellow #6, fumaric acid, imitation orange flavor, imitation pineapple flavor, magnesium aluminum silicate, methylparaben, purified water, sodium chloride, sorbitol solution and sucrose. It has a sodium content of 39.3 mg/5 mL, 1.71 mEq/5 mL, with a pH range of 2.2 to 3.7.

Used for

Tarproxen is used to treat diseases such as: Ankylosing Spondylitis, Aseptic Necrosis, Back Pain, Bursitis, Chronic Myofascial Pain, Costochondritis, Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis, Dysautonomia, Fever, Frozen Shoulder, Gout, Acute, Headache, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Muscle Pain, Neck Pain, Osteoarthritis, Pain, Period Pain, Radiculopathy, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sciatica, Spondylolisthesis, Tendonitis, Transverse Myelitis.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Tarproxen include: cough or hoarseness; fainting; weight loss; stomach pain; Belching; swollen, painful, or tender lymph glands in the neck, armpit, or groin; skin thinness; increased sweating.

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How to use Tarproxen

Read the Medication Guide provided by your pharmacist before you start using Tarproxen and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually twice daily with or without food. Swallow this medication whole. Do not break, crush, or chew the tablets. Doing so can release the drug too quickly, increasing the risk of side effects. Take this medication with a full glass of water (8 ounces/240 milliliters) unless your doctor directs you otherwise. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking this drug.

The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. To reduce your risk of stomach bleeding and other side effects, take this medication at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time. Do not increase your dose or take this drug more often than directed. For ongoing conditions such as arthritis, continue taking this medication as directed by your doctor.

For certain conditions (such as arthritis), it may take up to two weeks of taking this drug regularly until you get the full benefit.

Tell your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.

Osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis

People can manage the symptoms of osteoarthritis, which is commonly known as arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis with a dose of 220 mg to 550 mg of Tarproxen every 12 hours. Tarproxen does not cure these conditions but offers relief from pain and inflammation.

Dosage forms and strengths

Generic: Tarproxen

  • Form: immediate-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 250 mg, 375 mg, 500 mg
  • Form: delayed-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 375 mg, 500 mg

Generic: Tarproxen sodium

  • Form: immediate-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 275 mg, 550 mg
  • Form: extended-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 375 mg, 500 mg, 750 mg

Brand: Naprosyn (Tarproxen)

  • Form: immediate-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 250 mg, 375 mg, 500 mg
  • Form: delayed-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 375 mg, 500 mg

Brand: Anaprox (Tarproxen sodium)

  • Form: immediate-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 275 mg, 550 mg

Brand: Naprelan (Tarproxen sodium)

  • Form: extended-release oral tablet
  • Strengths: 375 mg, 500 mg, 750 mg

Q: I have rheumatoid arthritis and have been on Tarproxen 500 mg once a day as a part of my treatment along with Enbrel 50 mg injection once a week and methotrexate 20 mg once a week. I've been stable on this protocol for the last four years. Recently, I've been having an increase in swelling of the feet/ankles that does not seem to resolve with decreasing salt intake or remaining in a cooler environment. I get a regular CBC and liver panel every three months and all is normal. Could the Tarproxen be causing the swelling?

A: Tarproxen is a medication used to treat pain and inflammation and is part of a class called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). It works by blocking a hormone, called prostaglandin, that contributes to inflammation in the body. According to the prescribing information on Tarproxen the most common side effects of this medication are: heartburn, nausea, constipation, headache, ringing in the ears, and fluid retention. These effects were seen in up to 3 percent of patients taking the medication during clinical trials. For more information on Tarproxen, visit //www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/Tarproxen. If you feel you are experiencing fluid retention due to this medication, it would be best to consult with your physician to be sure that no other underlying condition is contributing to the problem. He or she will help you come up with a plan to deal with this issue. For more information on rheumatoid arthritis, visit //www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/guide/. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Lori Poulin, PharmD

Antidepressant drugs

Combining selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with Tarproxen increases your risk of stomach and intestinal bleeding. Examples of these drugs include:

  • citalopram
  • fluoxetine
  • fluvoxamine
  • paroxetine

Interactions

Drug-drug. Acetaminophen (chronic use), cyclosporine: increased risk of adverse renal effects

Anticoagulants, thrombolytics: increased anticoagulant effect

Antihypertensives, cefamandole, cefoperazone, cefotetan, diuretics, eptifibatide: decreased response

Antineoplastics, methotrexate: increased risk of nephrotoxicity

Aspirin: decreased Tarproxen efficacy

Aspirin, corticosteroids, other NSAIDs: additive adverse GI effects

Clopidogrel, plicamycin, ticlopidine, valproic acid: increased risk of bleeding Insulin, oral hypoglycemics: increased risk of hypoglycemia

Lithium: increased lithium blood level and risk of nephrotoxicity

Other photosensitizing agents: increased risk of photosensitivity

Probenecid: increased Tarproxen blood level, increased risk of toxicity

Drug-diagnostic tests. Alanine amino-transferase, alkaline phosphatase, aspartate aminotransferase, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, lactate dehydroge-nase, potassium: increased levels

Bleeding time: prolonged for up to 4 days after therapy ends

Creatinine clearance, glucose, hematocrit, hemoglobin, leukocytes, platelets: decreased values

Urine 5-hydroxy-indoleacetic acid, urine steroids: test interference

Drug-herbs. Anise, arnica, chamomile, clove, dong quai, fenugreek, feverfew, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, licorice: increased anticoagulant effect, increased risk of bleeding

How should this medicine be used?

Prescription Tarproxen comes as a regular tablet, a delayed-release (a tablet that releases the medication in the intestine to prevent damage to the stomach) tablet, an extended-release (long-acting) tablet, and a suspension (liquid) to take by mouth. The extended-release tablets are usually taken once a day. The tablets, delayed-release tablets, and suspension are usually taken twice a day for arthritis. The tablets and suspension are usually taken every 8 hours for gout, and every 6 to 8 hours as needed for pain. If you are taking Tarproxen on a regular basis, you should take it at the same time(s) every day.

Nonprescription Tarproxen comes as tablet and a gelatin coated tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken with a full glass of water every 8 to 12 hours as needed. Nonprescription Tarproxen may be taken with food or milk to prevent nausea.

Follow the directions on the package or prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take Tarproxen exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor or written on the package.

Shake the liquid well before each use to mix the medication evenly. Use the measuring cup provided to measure each dose of the liquid.

Swallow the delayed-release tablets and extended release tablets whole; do not split, chew, or crush them.

If you are taking Tarproxen to relieve the symptoms of arthritis, your symptoms may begin to improve within 1 week. It may take 2 weeks or longer for you to feel the full benefit of the medication.

Stop taking nonprescription Tarproxen and call your doctor if your symptoms get worse, you develop new or unexpected symptoms, the part of your body that was painful becomes red or swollen, your pain lasts for more than 10 days, or your fever lasts for more than 3 days.

Tarproxen

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How to store Tarproxen

  • Keep all medicines out of the reach and sight of children.
  • Store in a cool, dry place, away from direct heat and light.

10. Common questions

Tarproxen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Paracetamol is usually the best treatment for most types of pain, but Tarproxen is better for some types, such as period pain or back pain.

You should start to feel better 1 hour after taking Tarproxen.

But it might take up to 3 days for Tarproxen to work properly if you take it regularly twice a day.

Depending on why you're taking Tarproxen, you may only need to take it for a short time.

For example, if you have a sore back or period pain, you may only need to take Tarproxen for a day or two.

You may need to take it for longer if you have a long-term condition, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

If you need to take Tarproxen for a long time, your doctor may prescribe a medicine to protect your stomach from side effects.

It's best to take the lowest dose of Tarproxen for the shortest time to control your symptoms.

Talk to your doctor if you're unsure how long you need to take Tarproxen for.

Tarproxen can cause an ulcer in your stomach or gut if you take it for a long time or in big doses.

There's also a small risk that people taking very big doses for a long time may get heart failure or kidney failure.

It's best to take the lowest dose that works for the shortest possible time.

If you need to take Tarproxen very often or you're taking a big dose, talk to your doctor about your pain.

No, Tarproxen is not addictive, but it's important to always take it as prescribed.

The type of painkiller that's best depends on what type of pain you have and the cause of your pain.

If Tarproxen doesn't get rid of your pain, you can try painkillers that you can buy from shops and pharmacies, such as paracetamol or co-codamol (paracetamol combined with low-dose codeine).

If the medicine you buy isn't controlling your pain, your doctor may recommend another type of treatment to help your pain, such as exercise or physiotherapy.

Your doctor may also be able to prescribe a stronger painkiller, such as higher dose co-codamol or codeine.

Tarproxen doesn't work for some types of pain, such as nerve pain.

Your doctor will have to prescribe a different medicine if your pain is related to your nerves.

Tarproxen can cause an ulcer in your stomach or gut if you take it for a long time or in big doses, or if you're elderly or in poor general health.

Your doctor may tell you not to take Tarproxen if you have a stomach ulcer or you have had one in the past.

If you need to take Tarproxen but you're at risk of getting a stomach ulcer, your doctor may prescribe another medicine for you to take alongside Tarproxen to protect your stomach.

The most common symptom of a stomach ulcer is a burning or gnawing pain in the centre of the stomach.

But stomach ulcers aren't always painful and some people may have other symptoms, such as indigestion, heartburn and feeling sick.

If you're prone to stomach ulcers or have had one before, take paracetamol instead of Tarproxen as it's gentler on your stomach.

Precautions

Before taking Tarproxen, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to aspirin or other NSAIDs (such as ibuprofen, celecoxib); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: asthma (including a history of worsening breathing after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs), blood disorders (such as anemia, bleeding/clotting problems), growths in the nose (nasal polyps), heart disease (such as previous heart attack), high blood pressure, liver disease, stroke, throat/stomach/intestinal problems (such as bleeding, heartburn, ulcers).

Kidney problems can sometimes occur with the use of NSAID medications, including Tarproxen. Problems are more likely to occur if you are dehydrated, have heart failure or kidney disease, are an older adult, or if you take certain medications (see also Drug Interactions section). Drink plenty of fluids as directed by your doctor to prevent dehydration and tell your doctor right away if you have a change in the amount of urine.

This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness until you can do it safely. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

This medicine may cause stomach bleeding. Daily use of alcohol and tobacco, especially when combined with this medicine, may increase your risk for stomach bleeding. Limit alcohol and stop smoking. Consult your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Limit your time in the sun. Avoid tanning booths and sunlamps. Use sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors. Tell your doctor right away if you get sunburned or have skin blisters/redness.

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially stomach/intestinal bleeding and kidney problems.

Before using this medication, women of childbearing age should talk with their doctor(s) about the benefits and risks (such as miscarriage, trouble getting pregnant). Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you plan to become pregnant. During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. It is not recommended for use during the first and last trimesters of pregnancy due to possible harm to the unborn baby and interference with normal labor/delivery.

This drug passes into breast milk and may have undesirable effects on a nursing infant. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

Brand Name: Aleve, EC Naprosyn, Anaprox, Anaprox DS, Naprosyn, Naprox Sodium, Tarproxen EC, Tarproxen SR, Naprelan, Menstridol

Before taking this medicine

Tarproxen may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using this medicine, especially in older adults.

You should not use Tarproxen if you are allergic to it, or if you have ever had an asthma attack or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin or an NSAID.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use this medicine if you have:

heart disease, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke;

a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot;

a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;

liver or kidney disease; or

Taking Tarproxen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are pregnant. It may interfere with ovulation, causing temporary infertility.

Tarproxen can pass into breast milk and may cause side effects in the nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while using this medicine.

Tarproxen is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old. Do not give this medicine to a child without medical advice.

Q: When my husband had outpatient surgery on his back (lumbar discectomy), we were told that he should not take Tarproxen (500 mg) because it hinders the healing process. Yet my foot doctor gave me a prescription for Tarproxen (500 mg) to ease the swelling I experienced after foot surgery. So we are confused. Does Tarproxen hinder the healing process? In both of our surgeries, we had bones that needed to heal.

A: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like Tarproxen are powerful and effective drugs. They are routinely used in orthopedic conditions and in the perioperative setting. They are however associated with potentially serious side effects, and it is important to evaluate the risk versus benefit prior to medication use. There is evidence suggesting that these drugs adversely affect bone formation, and this has implications for their use in patients with fractures and other pathologies that involve bone remodelling. Similarly, other data suggest that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs significantly inhibit spinal fusion at doses typically used for postoperative pain control.


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