Ainezyl tablets

Ainezyl

  • Active Ingredient: Diclofenac
  • 100 mg
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What is Ainezyl?

The active ingredient of Ainezyl brand is diclofenac. Diclofenac is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). This medicine works by reducing substances in the body that cause pain and inflammation. The inactive ingredients in Diclofenac sodium delayed-release tablets include: hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, lactose monohydrate, magnesium stearate, methacrylic acid copolymer, microcrystalline cellulose, polyethylene glycol, povidone, propylene glycol, sodium starch glycolate, talc, titanium dioxide, triethyl citrate.

Used for

Ainezyl is used to treat diseases such as: Ankylosing Spondylitis, Aseptic Necrosis, Back Pain, Frozen Shoulder, Migraine, Muscle Pain, Osteoarthritis, Pain, Period Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sciatica, Spondyloarthritis.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Ainezyl include: confusion; irregular, fast or slow, or shallow breathing; dizziness; cloudy urine; constipation; Abdominal or stomach bloating, burning, cramping, or pain; itching skin or rash; decrease in urine output or decrease in urine-concentrating ability.

How to Buy Ainezyl tablets online?

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Can you take Ainezyl and Ibuprofen together?

No, these drugs should not be used together, as they are from the same class, thus their effects will become additive increasing the risk of side effects such as bleeding and gastrointestinal ulcers to happen.

If you need additional medicine for your pain relieving treatment, and you already use Ainezyl or ibuprofen consult your doctor. Your doctor may prescribe you acetaminophen of 500 mg as additional treatment, because it is much safer to be combined with ibuprofen or Ainezyl.

4. How and when to use them

You'll usually take Ainezyl tablets, capsules or suppositories 2 to 3 times a day.

The standard dose is 75mg to 150mg a day, depending on what your doctor prescribes for you. Follow your doctor's advice on how many tablets to take, and how many times a day.

If your doctor prescribes Ainezyl for your child, they'll use your child's weight to work out the right dose for them.

If you have pain all the time, your doctor may recommend slow-release Ainezyl tablets or capsules. It's usual to take these either once a day in the evening, or twice a day.

If you're taking slow-release Ainezyl twice a day, leave a gap of 10 to 12 hours between your doses.

HOW SUPPLIED

VOLTAREN ® (Ainezyl sodium enteric-coated tablets)

75 mg - light pink, biconvex, triangular-shaped, enteric-coated tablets (imprinted VOLTAREN 75 on one side in black ink)

Bottles of 100 - NDC 0028-0264-01

Store at room temperature 20°C to 25°C (68°F to 77°F); excursions permitted between 15°C to 30°C (59°F to 86°F) .

Protect from moisture.

Dispense in tight container (USP).

Distributed by: Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation East Hanover, NJ 07936. Revised: May 2016

Serious Skin Reactions

NSAIDs, including Ainezyl, can cause serious skin adverse reactions such as exfoliative dermatitis, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome (SJS), and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN), which can be fatal. These serious events may occur without warning. Inform patients about the signs and symptoms of serious skin reactions and to discontinue the use of VOLTAREN at the first appearance of skin rash or any other sign of hypersensitivity. VOLTAREN is contraindicated in patients with previous serious skin reactions to NSAIDs (see CONTRAINDICATIONS).

Hepatotoxicity

In clinical trials of Ainezyl- containing products, meaningful elevations (i.e., more than 3 times the ULN) of AST (SGOT) were observed in about 2% of approximately 5,700 patients at some time during Ainezyl treatment (ALT was not measured in all studies).

In a large, open-label, controlled trial of 3,700 patients treated with oral Ainezyl sodium for 2-6 months, patients were monitored first at 8 weeks and 1,200 patients were monitored again at 24 weeks. Meaningful elevations of ALT and/or AST occurred in about 4% of patients and included marked elevations (greater than 8 times the ULN) in about 1% of the 3,700 patients. In that open-label study, a higher incidence of borderline (less than 3 times the ULN), moderate (3-8 times the ULN), and marked (greater than 8 times the ULN) elevations of ALT or AST was observed in patients receiving Ainezyl when compared to other NSAIDs. Elevations in transaminases were seen more frequently in patients with osteoarthritis than in those with rheumatoid arthritis.

Almost all meaningful elevations in transaminases were detected before patients became symptomatic. Abnormal tests occurred during the first 2 months of therapy with Ainezyl in 42 of the 51 patients in all trials who developed marked transaminase elevations.

In postmarketing reports, cases of drug-induced hepatotoxicity have been reported in the first month, and in some cases, the first 2 months of therapy, but can occur at any time during treatment with Ainezyl. Postmarketing surveillance has reported cases of severe hepatic reactions, including liver necrosis, jaundice, fulminant hepatitis with and without jaundice, and liver failure. Some of these reported cases resulted in fatalities or liver transplantation.

In a European retrospective population-based, case-controlled study, 10 cases of Ainezyl associated drug-induced liver injury with current use compared with non-use of Ainezyl were associated with a statistically significant 4-fold adjusted odds ratio of liver injury. In this particular study, based on an overall number of 10 cases of liver injury associated with Ainezyl, the adjusted odds ratio increased further with female gender, doses of 150 mg or more, and duration of use for more than 90 days.

Physicians should measure transaminases at baseline and periodically in patients receiving long-term therapy with Ainezyl, because severe hepatotoxicity may develop without a prodrome of distinguishing symptoms. The optimum times for making the first and subsequent transaminase measurements are not known. Based on clinical trial data and postmarketing experiences, transaminases should be monitored within 4 to 8 weeks after initiating treatment with Ainezyl. However, severe hepatic reactions can occur at any time during treatment with Ainezyl.

If abnormal liver tests persist or worsen, if clinical signs and/or symptoms consistent with liver disease develop, or if systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, abdominal pain, diarrhea, dark urine, etc.), VOLTAREN should be discontinued immediately.

Inform patients of the warning signs and symptoms of hepatotoxicity (e.g., nausea, fatigue, lethargy, diarrhea, pruritus, jaundice, right upper quadrant tenderness, and "flu-like" symptoms). If clinical signs and symptoms consistent with liver disease develop, or if systemic manifestations occur (e.g., eosinophilia, rash, etc.), discontinue VOLTAREN immediately, and perform a clinical evaluation of the patient.

To minimize the potential risk for an adverse liver related event in patients treated with VOLTAREN, use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration possible. Exercise caution when prescribing VOLTAREN with concomitant drugs that are known to be potentially hepatotoxic (e.g., acetaminophen, antibiotics, anti-epileptics).

What if I take too much?

Taking too many Ainezyl tablets, capsules or suppositories can be dangerous. It can cause side effects such as:

  • stomach ache
  • feeling or being sick (vomiting)
  • diarrhoea
  • black poo or blood in your vomit - a sign of bleeding in your stomach
  • headaches
  • drowsiness
  • ringing in your ears (tinnitus)

If you accidentally take too much Ainezyl, contact your doctor straight away. If you need to go to hospital, take the Ainezyl packet or leaflet inside it plus any remaining medicine with you.

If you use too many plasters or too much gel by mistake, it's unlikely to do you any harm. But if you use too much and get any side effects, tell your doctor straight away

Other NSAIDs

Ainezyl is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Don’t combine it with other NSAIDs unless directed by your doctor, as this may increase your risk of stomach and bleeding issues. Examples of other NSAIDs include:


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