Lamidus tablets

Lamidus

  • Active Ingredient: Lamotrigine
  • 200 mg, 100 mg, 50 mg, 25 mg
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What is Lamidus?

The active ingredient of Lamidus brand is lamotrigine. Lamotrigine is an anti-epileptic medication, also called an anticonvulsant. Lamotrigine tablets, USP are supplied for oral administration as 25 mg, 100 mg, 150 mg or 200 mg tablets. Each tablet contains the labeled amount of Lamotrigine and the following inactive ingredients: anhydrous lactose, colloidal silicon dioxide, croscarmellose sodium, magnesium stearate, microcrystalline cellulose, pregelatinized starch (corn) and sodium lauryl sulfate. In addition, the 200 mg tablets contain D&C Yellow No. 10 Aluminum Lake and FD&C Blue No. 1 Aluminum Lake. Meets USP Dissolution Test 3.

Used for

Lamidus is used to treat diseases such as: Anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, Borderline Personality Disorder, Cyclothymic Disorder, Depression, Epilepsy, Migraine Prevention, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, Restless Legs Syndrome, Schizoaffective Disorder, Seizure Prevention.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Lamidus include: sores, ulcers, or white spots on the lips or in the mouth; dark-colored urine; nosebleeds; infection; bluish lips or skin; persistent bleeding or oozing from puncture sites, mouth, or nose.

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How long does it take to work?

In certain cases, the antidepressant and antimanic benefits of Lamidus are noticed pretty early on in the treatment cycle, says Dr. Aiken. “For some other patients, though, effects are seen after about a month of being on Lamidus treatment. But there will always be others that take a bit longer to experience the positive effects.”

What is Lamidus, and how does it work (mechanism of action)?

Lamidus is an oral drug that is used primarily for treating seizures. It is chemically unrelated to other anti-seizure drugs. The precise mechanism by which Lamidus exerts its anti-seizure action is not known. The FDA approved Lamidus in December 1974.

Adult, taking valproic acid, conversion to immediate-release Lamidus
  • Initiate and titrate to Lamidus dose of 200 mg/day, THEN
  • Decrease valproic acid dose by 500 mg/day at intervals of 1 week or longer to valproic acid dose of 500 mg/day; maintain this dose for 1 week, THEN
  • Increase Lamidus dose to 300 mg while valproic acid is decreased to 250 mg/day; maintain this dose for 1 week, THEN
  • Discontinue valproic acid
  • Increase Lamidus dose by 100 mg/day at weekly intervals to achieve a maintenance dose of 500 mg/day

Pediatric, taking valproic acid, conversion to immediate-release Lamidus (age over 16 years)

  • Initiate and titrate to Lamidus dose of 200 mg/day, THEN
  • Decrease valproic acid dose by 500 mg/day at intervals of 1 week or longer to valproic acid dose of 500 mg/day; maintain this dose for 1 week, THEN
  • Increase Lamidus dose to 300 mg while valproic acid is decreased to 250 mg/day; maintain this dose for 1 week, THEN
  • Discontinue valproic acid
  • Increase Lamidus dose by 100 mg/day at weekly intervals to achieve a maintenance dose of 500 mg/day

Adult, taking valproic acid, conversion to extended-release Lamidus

  • Conversion to monotherapy for patients taking 1 anticonvulsant drug
  • Weeks 1-2: 25 mg orally every other day
  • Weeks 3-4: 25 mg orally once/day
  • Week 5: 50 mg orally once/day
  • Week 6: 100 mg orally once/day
  • Weeks 7-10: 150 mg orally once/day; begin valproic acid withdrawal over 5-7 weeks to 500mg/day and maintain for 1 week
  • Week 11: 200 mg orally once/day; decrease valproic acid dose to 250 mg/day for 1 week
  • Weeks 12-23: 250-300 mg orally once/day; discontinue valproic acid

Pediatric, taking valproic acid, conversion to extended-release Lamidus (age over 13 years)

  • Conversion to monotherapy for patients taking 1 anticonvulsant drug
  • Weeks 1-2: 25 mg orally every other day
  • Weeks 3-4: 25 mg orally once/day
  • Week 5: 50 mg orally once/day
  • Week 6: 100 mg orally once/day; begin valproic acid withdrawal over 5-7 weeks
  • Weeks 7-10: 150 mg orally once/day
  • Week 11: 200 mg orally once/day
  • Weeks 12-23: 250-300 mg orally once/day

Taking carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, or primidone (conversion to immediate-release Lamidus)

  • Initiate and titrate to Lamidus dose of 500 mg/day as per recommendations
  • Decrease concomitant enzyme-inducing AED by 20% each week over a 4-week period and then withdraw

Taking neutral AED, conversion to extended-release Lamidus

  • Adult:
    • Conversion to monotherapy for patients taking 1 anticonvulsant drug
    • Weeks 1-2: 25 mg orally once/day
    • Weeks 3-4: 50 mg orally once/day
    • Week 5: 100 mg orally once/day
    • Week 6: 150-200 mg orally once/day
    • Weeks 7-23: 250-300 mg orally once/day; begin AED withdrawal over 5-week period by weekly 20% decreases in daily dose
    • Children over 16 years: Initiate and titrate to Lamidus dose of 500 mg/day as per recommendations; decrease concomitant enzyme-inducing AED by 20% each week over a 4-week period and then withdraw

COMMON BRAND(S): Lamictal

GENERIC NAME(S): Lamidus

Rarely, serious (sometimes fatal) skin rashes have occurred while taking this medication. These rashes are more common in children than in adults. Rashes may be more likely if you start at too high a dose, if you increase your dose too quickly, or if you take this medication with certain other anti-seizure medications (valproic acid, divalproex). These rashes may occur anytime during use, but most serious rashes have occurred within 2 to 8 weeks of starting Lamidus.

Get medical help right away if you develop any type of skin rash, or if you have other signs of a serious allergic reaction such as hives, fever, swollen lymph nodes, painful sores in the mouth or around the eyes, swelling of the face/tongue/throat, trouble breathing, or liver problems (symptoms include stomach/abdominal pain, nausea/vomiting that continues, dark urine, yellowing eyes/skin). Your doctor will tell you if you should stop taking Lamidus. Even after you stop taking this, it is still possible for a rash to become life-threatening or cause permanent scars or other problems.

Lamidus is used alone or with other medications to prevent and control seizures. It may also be used to help prevent the extreme mood swings of bipolar disorder in adults.

Lamidus is known as an anticonvulsant or antiepileptic drug. It is thought to work by restoring the balance of certain natural substances in the brain.

This drug is not approved for use in children younger than 2 years due to an increased risk of side effects (such as infections).

For patients receiving LAMICTAL in combination with other AEDs, a re-evaluation of all AEDs in the regimen should be considered if a change in seizure control or an appearance or worsening of adverse reactions is observed.

If a decision is made to discontinue therapy with LAMICTAL, a step-wise reduction of dose over at least 2 weeks (approximately 50% per week) is recommended unless safety concerns require a more rapid withdrawal .

Discontinuing carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, primidone, or other drugs such as rifampin and the protease inhibitors lopinavir/ritonavir and atazanavir/ritonavir that induce Lamidus glucuronidation should prolong the half-life of Lamidus; discontinuing valproate should shorten the half-life of Lamidus.

In the controlled clinical trials, there was no increase in the incidence, type, or severity of adverse reactions following abrupt termination of LAMICTAL. In the clinical development program in adults with bipolar disorder, 2 patients experienced seizures shortly after abrupt withdrawal of LAMICTAL. Discontinuation of LAMICTAL should involve a step-wise reduction of dose over at least 2 weeks (approximately 50% per week) unless safety concerns require a more rapid withdrawal .

The target dose of LAMICTAL is 200 mg/day (100 mg/day in patients taking valproate, which decreases the apparent clearance of Lamidus, and 400 mg/day in patients not taking valproate and taking either carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, primidone, or other drugs such as rifampin and the protease inhibitor lopinavir/ritonavir that increase the apparent clearance of Lamidus). In the clinical trials, doses up to 400 mg/day as monotherapy were evaluated; however, no additional benefit was seen at 400 mg/day compared with 200 mg/day . Accordingly, doses above 200 mg/day are not recommended.

Treatment with LAMICTAL is introduced, based on concurrent medications, according to the regimen outlined in Table 5. If other psychotropic medications are withdrawn following stabilization, the dose of LAMICTAL should be adjusted. In patients discontinuing valproate, the dose of LAMICTAL should be doubled over a 2-week period in equal weekly increments (see Table 6). In patients discontinuing carbamazepine, phenytoin, phenobarbital, primidone, or other drugs such as rifampin and the protease inhibitors lopinavir/ritonavir and atazanavir/ritonavir that induce Lamidus glucuronidation, the dose of LAMICTAL should remain constant for the first week and then should be decreased by half over a 2-week period in equal weekly decrements (see Table 6). The dose of LAMICTAL may then be further adjusted to the target dose (200 mg) as clinically indicated.

If other drugs are subsequently introduced, the dose of LAMICTAL may need to be adjusted. In particular, the introduction of valproate requires reduction in the dose of LAMICTAL .

To avoid an increased risk of rash, the recommended initial dose and subsequent dose escalations of LAMICTAL should not be exceeded .

Table 5: Escalation Regimen for LAMICTAL in Adults with Bipolar Disorder

Table 6: Dosage Adjustments to LAMICTAL in Adults with Bipolar Disorder following Discontinuation of Psychotropic Medications

Will my dose go up or down?

When you start taking Lamidus, it's important to increase the dose slowly as this will help reduce or stop some side effects happening.

Once you find a dose that suits you, it'll usually stay the same.

Q: Can Lamidus cause stomach problems? If so, what are they?

A: Lamictal (Lamidus) is a medication that is used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder. It is used in combination with other medications to treat seizures in adults and children and it is used to delay mood episodes in patients with bipolar disorder. The prescribing information on Lamidus lists the following as common side effects of this medication: dizziness, double vision, drowsiness, headaches, coordination problems, nausea or vomiting. Some less common side effects related to stomach problems are: indigestion/heartburn, abdominal pain, and constipation. For more information on Lamidus, click on this link: //www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/lamictal If you are experiencing side effects from this medication that are bothersome or don't feel quite right, you should consult with your physician. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Lori Poulin, PharmD

Why is this medication prescribed?

Lamidus extended-release (long-acting) tablets are used with other medications to treat certain types of seizures in patients who have epilepsy. All types of Lamidus tablets (tablets, orally disintegrating tablets, and chewable tablets) other than the extended-release tablets are used alone or with other medications to treat seizures in people who have epilepsy or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (a disorder that causes seizures and often causes developmental delays). All types of Lamidus tablets other than the extended-release tablets are also used to increase the time between episodes of depression, mania (frenzied or abnormally excited mood), and other abnormal moods in patients with bipolar I disorder (manic-depressive disorder; a disease that causes episodes of depression, episodes of mania, and other abnormal moods). Lamidus has not been shown to be effective when people experience the actual episodes of depression or mania, so other medications must be used to help people recover from these episodes. Lamidus is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

WARNING

Severe, life-threatening rashes have occurred with Lamidus. The risk of rash is increased if the dose is increased faster than recommended or if patients also are taking valproic acid. Patients taking Lamidus should report any rash to a physician immediately, as there's no way to tell at the onset whether the rash will be mild or severe.

6. How to cope with s >

What to do about:

  • headaches - make sure you rest and drink plenty of fluids. Do not drink too much alcohol. Ask your pharmacist to recommend a painkiller. Talk to your doctor if your headaches last longer than a week or are severe.
  • feeling drowsy, sleepy or dizzy - as your body gets used to Lamidus, these side effects should wear off. Do not drive, ride a bike or operate machinery until you feel more alert. If they do not go within a week or two, your doctor may reduce your dose or increase it more slowly. If that does not work, speak to your doctor. You may need to switch to a different medicine.
  • aggression, or feeling irritable or agitated - talk to your doctor.
  • shaking or tremors - talk to your doctor if this is bothering you. These symptoms can be a sign that the dose is too high for you. It may help to change your dose or take your medicine at a different time of day.
  • difficulty sleeping - talk to your doctor.
  • diarrhoea - drink lots of fluids, such as water or squash, to avoid dehydration. Signs of dehydration include peeing less than usual or having dark, strong-smelling pee. Do not take any other medicines to treat diarrhoea without speaking to a pharmacist or doctor. Speak to a doctor if symptoms get worse or last longer than a week.
  • feeling or being sick - stick to simple meals and do not eat rich or spicy food. It might help to take your Lamidus after a meal or snack. If you're being sick, take small, frequent sips of water or squash to avoid dehydration. Speak to a doctor if symptoms get worse or last longer than a week.

8. Cautions with other medicines

Some medicines and Lamidus interfere with each other and increase the chances of side effects. Your doctor may need to change your dose of Lamidus.

Check with your pharmacist or doctor if you're taking:

  • other medicines used to treat epilepsy, such as carbamazepine, felbamate, gabapentin, levetiracetam, oxcarbazepine, phenobarbital, phenytoin, pregabalin, primidone, topiramate, valproate or zonisamide
  • aripiprazole, lithium, olanzapine or risperidone (used for mental health problems)
  • bupropion, a stop smoking medicine
  • rifampicin, an antibiotic usually given to treat tuberculosis (TB)
  • medicines used to treat HIV
  • hormonal contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy (HRT)

Generic Name: Lamidus (la MOE tri jeen)Brand Name: LaMICtal, LaMICtal ODT, LaMICtal XR, Subvenite, . show all 20 brand names LaMICtal CD, LaMICtal Starter Kit (Blue), LaMICtal Starter Kit (Green), LaMICtal Starter Kit (Orange), LaMICtal ODT Patient Titration Kit (Blue), LaMICtal ODT Patient Titration Kit (Orange), LaMICtal ODT Patient Titration Kit (Green), LaMICtal XR Patient Titration Kit (Blue), LaMICtal XR Patient Titration Kit (Orange), LaMICtal XR Patient Titration Kit (Green), LamoTRIgine Starter Kit (Blue), LamoTRIgine Starter Kit (Green), LamoTRIgine Starter Kit (Orange), Subvenite Starter Kit (Blue), Subvenite Starter Kit (Green), Subvenite Starter Kit (Orange)

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Oct 8, 2019 – Written by Cerner Multum


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