Antinaus tablets

Antinaus

  • Active Ingredient: Prochlorperazine
  • 5 mg
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What is Antinaus?

The active ingredient of Antinaus brand is prochlorperazine. Prochlorperazine is an anti-psychotic medicine in a group of drugs called phenothiazines (FEEN-oh-THYE-a-zeens). It works by changing the actions of chemicals in your brain. Prochlorperazine Edisylate Injection, an antiemetic and antipsychotic, is a sterile solution intended for intramuscular or intravenous administration. Each mL contains Prochlorperazine 5 mg as the edisylate, monobasic sodium phosphate monohydrate 5 mg, sodium tartrate dihydrate 12 mg, saccharin sodium 0.9 mg and benzyl alcohol 7.5 mg in Water for Injection. pH 4.2-6.2.

Used for

Antinaus is used to treat diseases such as: Anxiety, Hiccups, Nausea/Vomiting, Psychosis.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Antinaus include: ; ; ; ; ; ; ; .

How to Buy Antinaus tablets online?

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Before taking this medicine

You should not use Compazine if you are allergic to it, or if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, or narcotic medications.

Compazine is not approved for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. This medicine may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

Compazine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old or weighing less than 20 pounds. Talk with your doctor before giving this medicine to a child or teenager with a fever, flu symptoms, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Do not give this medicine to a child before or after a surgery.

Long-term use of Antinaus can cause a serious movement disorder that may not be reversible. The longer you take Compazine, the more likely you are to develop this movement disorder. The risk of this side effect is higher in women and older adults.

To make sure Compazine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

a blockage in your intestines;

a serious side effect while using Compazine or another phenothiazine.

Tell your doctor if you will be exposed to extreme heat or cold, or to insecticide poisons while you are taking Compazine.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

Taking antipsychotic medicine in the last 3 months of pregnancy may cause problems in the newborn, such as withdrawal symptoms, breathing problems, feeding problems, fussiness, tremors, and limp or stiff muscles. However, you may have withdrawal symptoms or other problems if you stop taking your medicine during pregnancy. If you become pregnant, do not stop taking Compazine without your doctor's advice.

Antinaus can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Precautions

Before taking Antinaus, tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are allergic to it; or to other phenothiazines (such as chlorpromazine); or if you have any other allergies. This product may contain inactive ingredients, which can cause allergic reactions or other problems. Talk to your pharmacist for more details.

Before using this medication, tell your doctor or pharmacist your medical history, especially of: breathing problems (such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-COPD), blood/immune system disorders (such as bone marrow depression), high pressure in the eye (glaucoma), heart disease (such as irregular heartbeat), liver disease, kidney disease, certain brain disorders (such as Reye's syndrome, seizures), stomach/intestine problems (such as blockage), difficulty urinating (for example, due to enlarged prostate), pheochromocytoma.

This drug may make you dizzy or drowsy or blur your vision. Alcohol or marijuana (cannabis) can make you more dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs alertness or clear vision until you can do it safely. Avoid alcoholic beverages. Talk to your doctor if you are using marijuana (cannabis).

Before having surgery, tell your doctor or dentist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products).

This medication may make you more sensitive to the sun. Limit your time in the sun. Avoid tanning booths and sunlamps. Use sunscreen and wear protective clothing when outdoors. Tell your doctor right away if you get sunburned or have skin blisters/redness.

This medication may make you sweat less, making you more likely to get heat stroke. Avoid doing things that may cause you to overheat, such as hard work or exercise in hot weather, or using hot tubs. When the weather is hot, drink a lot of fluids and dress lightly. If you overheat, quickly look for a place to cool down and rest. Get medical help right away if you have a fever that does not go away, mental/mood changes, headache, or dizziness.

Children with short-term illnesses (such as a viral infection, dehydration) may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially nerve/muscle problems.

Older adults may be more sensitive to the side effects of this drug, especially low blood pressure, constipation, urinary problems, and nerve/muscle problems.

During pregnancy, this medication should be used only when clearly needed. Discuss the risks and benefits with your doctor. Babies born to mothers who have used this drug during the last 3 months of pregnancy may rarely develop symptoms including muscle stiffness or shakiness, drowsiness, feeding/breathing difficulties, or constant crying. If you notice any of these symptoms in your newborn anytime during their first month, tell the doctor right away.

It is unknown if Antinaus passes into breast milk. However, similar drugs pass into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding.

What is Antinaus?

Antinaus is used to treat nausea and vomiting due to any cause, including migraine and motion sickness. The active ingredient Antinaus controls nausea and vomiting by blocking dopamine receptors in an area of the brain called the vomiting centre. You can order Antinaus online via a Dokteronline.com partner pharmacy. Antinaus is a prescription-only medicine that can be obtained through an online consultation.

What are the possible side effects of Antinaus (Compazine)?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop taking Antinaus and call your doctor at once if you have any of these signs of a serious movement disorder:

  • tremors or shaking in your arms or legs;
  • uncontrolled muscle movements in your face (chewing, lip smacking, frowning, tongue movement, blinking or eye movement); or
  • any new or unusual muscle movements you cannot control.

Also call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • little or no urinating;
  • trouble swallowing, stiffness or muscle spasms in your neck;
  • feeling restless, jittery, or agitated;
  • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);
  • fast or slow heart rate;
  • low white blood cell counts--sudden weakness or ill feeling, fever, chills, sore throat, swollen gums, mouth sores, pain when swallowing, skin sores, cough, trouble breathing;
  • lupus-like syndrome--joint pain or swelling with fever, swollen glands, muscle aches, chest pain, vomiting, unusual thoughts or behavior, and patchy skin color; or
  • severe nervous system reaction--very stiff (rigid) muscles, high fever, sweating, confusion, fast or uneven heartbeats, tremors, feeling like you might pass out.

Side effects such as painful or difficult urination, constipation, and confusion may be more likely in older adults.

Common side effects may include:

  • dizziness, drowsiness;
  • blurred vision;
  • itching or rash;
  • missed menstrual periods; or
  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

How should this medicine be used?

Antinaus comes as a tablet to take by mouth and as a suppository to place in the rectum. Antinaus tablets are usually taken three to four times a day by adults and are usually given to children one to three times a day. Antinaus suppositories are usually inserted twice a day. Use Antinaus at around the same time(s) every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use Antinaus exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Your doctor may start you on a low dose of Antinaus and gradually increase your dose, not more often than once every 2-3 days.

If you are using Antinaus to treat schizophrenia, Antinaus may help control your symptoms but will not cure your condition. Continue to use Antinaus even if you feel well. Do not stop using Antinaus without talking to your doctor. If you suddenly stop using Antinaus, you may experience withdrawal symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and shakiness.

What other drugs will affect Antinaus?

Taking Antinaus with other drugs that make you sleepy or slow your breathing can cause dangerous side effects or death. Ask your doctor before taking a sleeping pill, opioid pain medicine, prescription cough medicine, a muscle relaxer, or medicine for anxiety, depression, or seizures.

Many drugs can interact with Antinaus. Not all possible interactions are listed here. Tell your doctor about all your current medicines and any you start or stop using, especially:

a diuretic or "water pill";

This list is not complete and many other drugs can interact with Antinaus. This includes prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Give a list of all your medicines to any healthcare provider who treats you.

How to use Antinaus Maleate

Take this medication by mouth with or without food as directed by your doctor, usually 3 to 4 times daily.

The dosage is based on your age, medical condition, and response to treatment. In children, the dosage may also be based on weight. Do not increase your dose or take this medication more often than directed.

Tell your doctor if your condition persists or worsens.

Important: The information below refers to products available in the United States that contain Antinaus.

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • fever
  • muscle stiffness
  • falling
  • confusion
  • fast or irregular heartbeat
  • sweating
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • flu-like symptoms
  • sore throat, chills, and other signs of infection
  • neck cramps
  • tongue that sticks out of the mouth
  • tightness in the throat
  • difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • fine, worm-like tongue movements
  • uncontrollable, rhythmic face, mouth, or jaw movements
  • seizures
  • rash
  • hives
  • itching
  • swelling of the eyes, face, mouth, lips, tongue, throat, arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • vision loss, especially at night
  • seeing everything with a brown tint
  • coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time)
  • erection that lasts for hours

Antinaus may cause other side effects. Tell your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

Before taking this medicine

You should not use Antinaus if you are allergic to it, or if you have recently used alcohol, sedatives, tranquilizers, or narcotic medications.

Antinaus is not approved for use in psychotic conditions related to dementia. Antinaus may increase the risk of death in older adults with dementia-related conditions.

Antinaus is not approved for use by anyone younger than 2 years old or weighing less than 20 pounds. Talk with your doctor before giving Antinaus to a child or teenager with a fever, flu symptoms, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Do not give this medicine to a child before or after a surgery.

Long-term use of Antinaus can cause a serious movement disorder that may not be reversible. The longer you take Antinaus, the more likely you are to develop this movement disorder. The risk of this side effect is higher in women and older adults.

To make sure Antinaus is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

a blockage in your intestines;

a serious side effect while using Antinaus or another phenothiazine.

Tell your doctor if you will be exposed to extreme heat or cold, or to insecticide poisons while you are taking Antinaus.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant.

Taking antipsychotic medicine in the last 3 months of pregnancy may cause problems in the newborn, such as withdrawal symptoms, breathing problems, feeding problems, fussiness, tremors, and limp or stiff muscles. However, you may have withdrawal symptoms or other problems if you stop taking your medicine during pregnancy. If you become pregnant, do not stop taking Antinaus without your doctor's advice.

Antinaus can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

Can Antinaus cause problems?

Along with their useful effects, most medicines can cause unwanted side-effects although not everyone experiences them. The table below contains some of the most common ones associated with Antinaus. You will find a full list in the manufacturer's information leaflet supplied with your medicine. The unwanted effects often improve as your body adjusts to the new medicine, but speak with your doctor or pharmacist if any of the following continue or become troublesome.

When not to use Antinaus

Antinaus is not suitable for everyone. Do not use this medicine if you are allergic to Antinaus or any other ingredient in this medicine. Consult a doctor before using this medicine if you have:

  • A heart, liver or blood disease;
  • Glaucoma, epilepsy, dementia or Parkinson's disease;
  • Prostate and thyroid problems;
  • Other health issues.

To avoid potential drug interaction, it is important to tell your doctor what medicines you are already taking before you start treatment with this medicine. There may be an increased risk of drowsiness and sedation if Antinaus is taken with other medicines, including certain tranquillisers and antidepressants. For more information on contraindications, interactions and warnings, see the package leaflet.

Antinaus is used to treat nausea and vomiting due to any cause, including migraine and motion sickness. The active ingredient Antinaus controls nausea and vomiting by blocking dopamine receptors in an area of the brain called the vomiting centre. More information

A doctor will review your order and write you a prescription, if appropriate. This prescription is then forwarded to a pharmacy. The pharmacy will have your medicine delivered to you within one to three working days. Read more about this process here.

Antinaus 3mg 50 buccal tabl.

IMPORTANT WARNING:

Studies have shown that older adults with dementia (a brain disorder that affects the ability to remember, think clearly, communicate, and perform daily activities and that may cause changes in mood and personality) who take antipsychotics (medications for mental illness) such as Antinaus have an increased chance of death during treatment.

Antinaus is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of behavior problems in older adults with dementia. Talk to the doctor who prescribed this medication if you, a family member, or someone you care for has dementia and is taking Antinaus. For more information, visit the FDA website: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs

Antinaus Pictures

By Kathleen Doheny | Medically Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD

Latest Update: 2014-12-04 Copyright © 2014 Everyday Health Media, LLC

How to take Antinaus

  • Before you start this treatment, read the manufacturer's printed information leaflet from ins >

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