Parizac capsules

Parizac

  • Active Ingredient: Omeprazole
  • 40 mg, 20 mg, 10 mg
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What is Parizac?

The active ingredient of Parizac brand is omeprazole. Omeprazole is a proton pump inhibitor that decreases the amount of acid produced in the stomach. Omeprazole, USP is a white to off-white crystalline powder that melts with decomposition at about 155В°C. It is a weak base, freely soluble in ethanol and methanol, and slightly soluble in acetone and isopropanol and very slightly soluble in water. The stability of Omeprazole is a function of pH; it is rapidly degraded in acid media, but has acceptable stability under alkaline conditions. Omeprazole is supplied as delayed-release capsules for oral administration. Each delayed-release capsule contains either 10 mg, 20 mg or 40 mg of Omeprazole in the form of enteric-coated beads with the following inactive ingredients: ammonium hydroxide, dibutyl sebacate, D&C Yellow No. 10, FD&C Green No. 3, gelatin, ethylcellulose, fumed silica, hypromellose, methacrylic acid, oleic acid, silicon dioxide, sodium lauryl sulfate, sugar spheres, talc, titanium dioxide and triethyl citrate. The 40 mg empty gelatin capsule shell also contains FD&C Blue No. 1. In addition, the white imprinting ink contains ammonium hydroxide, propylene glycol, shellac glaze, simethicone and titanium dioxide. Meets USP Dissolution Test 2.

Used for

Parizac is used to treat diseases such as: Barrett's Esophagus, Duodenal Ulcer, Erosive Esophagitis, Gastritis/Duodenitis, GERD, Helicobacter Pylori Infection, Indigestion, Multiple Endocrine Adenomas, Stomach Ulcer, Systemic Mastocytosis, Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Parizac include: sore throat; fever; diarrhea or loose stools; runny nose; fast, racing, or uneven heartbeat; Back, leg, or stomach pain.

How to Buy Parizac capsules online?

To purchase Parizac online - simply click on the "Buy Now" button from the top and follow on to our shop. Order and payment takes a couple of minutes, and all steps are obvious. We do not take a medical prescription plus we have many procedures of payment. With all the details of fast delivery and confidentiality, then you may read on the applicable pages on the hyperlinks in the navigation menu.

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7. Pregnancy and breastfeeding

Usually, Parizac is safe to take during pregnancy and while breastfeeding.

If you're pregnant, it's always better to try to treat indigestion without taking a medicine.

Your doctor or midwife will first advise that you try to ease your symptoms by eating smaller meals more often and avoiding fatty and spicy foods.

They may also suggest raising the head of your bed 10 to 20cm by putting something under your bed or mattress, so that your chest and head are above your waist. This helps stop stomach acid travelling up towards your throat.

If lifestyle changes don't work, you may be recommended a medicine like Parizac.

For more information about how Parizac can affect you and your baby during pregnancy, read this leaflet on the Best Use of Medicines in Pregnancy (BUMPS) website.

The elimination rate of Parizac was somewhat decreased in the elderly, and bioavailability was increased. Parizac was 76% bioavailable when a single 40 mg oral dose of Parizac (buffered solution) was administered to healthy elderly volunteers, versus 58% in young volunteers given the same dose. Nearly 70% of the dose was recovered in urine as metabolites of Parizac and no unchanged drug was detected. The plasma clearance of Parizac was 250 mL/min (about half that of young volunteers) and its plasma half-life averaged one hour, about twice that of young healthy volunteers.

How long does Parizac take to work?

This depends on why you're taking it. You should get some relief from heartburn and indigestion symptoms straight away, or at least in the first few days of taking Parizac.

However, you may need to keep taking Parizac for a few weeks, depending on why it's been prescribed. Some conditions may require you to take Parizac on a long-term basis, either to keep symptoms under control or to avoid the condition coming back.

If you've bought Parizac without a prescription you should see your doctor if your symptoms haven't got better after taking it for two weeks.

Systemic effects of Parizac in the CNS, cardiovascular and respiratory systems have not been found to date. Parizac, given in oral doses of 30 or 40 mg for 2 to 4 weeks, had no effect on thyroid function, carbohydrate metabolism, or circulating levels of parathyroid hormone, cortisol, estradiol, testosterone, prolactin, cholecystokinin or secretin.

No effect on gastric emptying of the solid and liquid components of a test meal was demonstrated after a single dose of Parizac 90 mg. In healthy subjects, a single I.V. dose of Parizac (0.35 mg/kg) had no effect on intrinsic factor secretion. No systematic dose-dependent effect has been observed on basal or stimulated pepsin output in humans.

However, when intragastric pH is maintained at 4.0 or above, basal pepsin output is low, and pepsin activity is decreased.

As do other agents that elevate intragastric pH, Parizac administered for 14 days in healthy subjects produced a significant increase in the intragastric concentrations of viable bacteria. The pattern of the bacterial species was unchanged from that commonly found in saliva. All changes resolved within three days of stopping treatment.

The course of Barrett's esophagus in 106 patients was evaluated in a U.S. double-blind controlled study of PRILOSEC 40 mg twice daily for 12 months followed by 20 mg twice daily for 12 months or ranitidine 300 mg twice daily for 24 months. No clinically significant impact on Barrett's mucosa by antisecretory therapy was observed. Although neosquamous epithelium developed during antisecretory therapy, complete elimination of Barrett's mucosa was not achieved. No significant difference was observed between treatment groups in development of dysplasia in Barrett's mucosa and no patient developed esophageal carcinoma during treatment. No significant differences between treatment groups were observed in development of ECL cell hyperplasia, corpus atrophic gastritis, corpus intestinal metaplasia, or colon polyps exceeding 3 mm in diameter.

Gastritis Symptoms, Causes, Diet, Home Remedies, Treatment, and Cure

Gastritis (acute and chronic) is an inflammation of the lining of the stomach Some people have no gastritis symptoms, but when they do occur they may include bloating, belching, loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. H. pylori infection and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the two main causes of gastritis. Alcohol, caffeine, and high-fat foods also can cause gastritis. Fried, fatty, and spicy foods, and alcohol aggravate gastritis symptoms. Other stomach lining irritants that aggravate symptoms include cigarette smoking, acidic juices, caffeine, tomato products, peppers, and chili powder. Foods that sooth gastritis symptoms, and that help reduce and stop H. pylori infection growth in the stomach include apples, onions, garlic, teas, green leafy vegetables, coconut water, and wheat bran. Gastritis is diagnosed with endoscopy, blood tests, or stool tests. Some people get relief from gastritis symptoms with prescription and non-prescription antacids, histamine blockers like famotidine (Pepcid AC) or ranitidine (Zantac 75), or proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) like Parizac (Prilosec) and esParizac (Nexium). These drugs will not cure gastritis. Complications of gastritis include gastric cancers, MALT lymphoma, renal problems, and death.


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