Fusix tablets

Fusix

  • Active Ingredient: Furosemide
  • 100 mg, 40 mg
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What is Fusix?

The active ingredient of Fusix brand is furosemide. Furosemide is a loop diuretic (water pill) that prevents your body from absorbing too much salt. This allows the salt to instead be passed in your urine. C12H11ClN2O5S M.W. 330.74 Furosemide Tablets USP are available for oral administration containing 20 mg, 40 mg or 80 mg of Furosemide USP. The tablets meet Dissolution Test 1. Each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: colloidal silicon dioxide, corn starch, lactose monohydrate, microcrystalline cellulose, pregelatinized starch, purified water, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium starch glycolate and stearic acid. Furosemide Oral Solution USP is also available for oral administration containing either 10 mg per mL or 40 mg per 5 mL. The oral solution contains the following inactive ingredients: D and C Yellow No. 10, FD and C Yellow No. 6, flavors, potassium carbonate 1½ hydrate, propylene glycol, purified water and sorbitol solution. The 10 mg/mL solution is orange flavored and contains prosweet liquid and saccharin sodium. The 40 mg/5 mL solution is pineapple-peach flavored and contains sweet tone.

Used for

Fusix is used to treat diseases such as: Ascites, Edema, Heart Failure, High Blood Pressure, Hypercalcemia, Nonobstructive Oliguria, Oliguria, Pulmonary Edema, Renal Failure, Renal Transplant.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Fusix include: changes in skin color, pain, tenderness, or swelling of the foot or leg; increased sensitivity of the skin to sunlight; hearing loss; sweating; increased hunger.

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SIDE EFFECTS

Adverse reactions are categorized below by organ system and listed by decreasing severity.

Gastrointestinal System Reactions

  1. hepatic encephalopathy in patients with hepatocellular insufficiency
  2. pancreatitis
  3. jaundice (intrahepatic cholestatic jaundice)
  4. increased liver enzymes
  5. anorexia
  6. oral and gastric irritation
  7. cramping
  8. diarrhea
  9. constipation
  10. nausea
  11. vomiting

Systemic Hypersensitivity Reactions

Central Nervous System Reactions

  1. Orthostatic hypotension may occur and be aggravated by alcohol, barbiturates or narcotics.
  2. Increase in cholesterol and triglyceride serum levels

Whenever adverse reactions are moderate or severe, LASIX dosage should be reduced or therapy withdrawn.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Lasix (Fusix)

Pregnancy

Pregnancy Category C -Fusix has been shown to cause unexplained maternal deaths and abortions in rabbits at 2, 4 and 8 times the maximal recommended human dose. There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. LASIX should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus.

Treatment during pregnancy requires monitoring of fetal growth because of the potential for higher birth weights.

The effects of Fusix on embryonic and fetal development and on pregnant dams were studied in mice, rats and rabbits.

Fusix caused unexplained maternal deaths and abortions in the rabbit at the lowest dose of 25 mg/kg (2 times the maximal recommended human dose of 600 mg/day). In another study, a dose of 50 mg/kg (4 times the maximal recommended human dose of 600 mg/day) also caused maternal deaths and abortions when administered to rabbits between Days 12 and 17 of gestation. In a third study, none of the pregnant rabbits survived a dose of 100 mg/kg. Data from the above studies indicate fetal lethality that can precede maternal deaths.

The results of the mouse study and one of the three rabbit studies also showed an increased incidence and severity of hydronephrosis (distention of the renal pelvis and, in some cases, of the ureters) in fetuses derived from the treated dams as compared with the incidence in fetuses from the control group.

Before taking Fusix,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Fusix, sulfonamide medications, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in Fusix tablets or solution. Ask your pharmacist or check the patient information for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: aminoglycoside antibiotics such as amikacin, gentamicin (Garamycin), or tobramycin (Bethkis, Tobi); angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril, lisinopril (in Prinzide, in Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc, in Uniretic), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril, in Accuretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); angiotensin II receptor antagonists (ARB) such as azilsartan (Edarbi, Edarbyclor), candesartan (Atacand, in Atacand HCT), eprosartan (Teveten, in Teveten HCT), irbesartan (Avapro, in Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, in Azor, Benicar HCT), telmisartan (Micardis, in Micardis HCT), and valsartan (Diovan, in Diovan HCT, Exforge); aspirin and other salicylates; barbiturates such as phenobarbital and secobarbital (Seconal); corticosteroids such as betamethasone (Celestone), budesonide (Entocort), cortisone (Cortone), dexamethasone (Decadron, Dexpak, Dexasone, others), fludrocortisone (Floriner), hydrocortisone (Cortef, Hydrocortone), methylprednisolone (Medrol, Meprolone, others), prednisolone (Prelone, others), prednisone (Deltasone, Meticorten, Sterapred, others), and triamcinolone (Aristocort, Azmacort); cisplatin (Platinol); cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune); digoxin (Lanoxin), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin); indomethacin (Indocin); laxatives; lithium (Lithobid); medications for diabetes, high blood pressure and pain; methotrexate (Trexall); probenecid (Probalan, Probenemid); and phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • if you are taking sucralfate (Carafate), take it 2 hours before or after you take Fusix.
  • tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor may tell you not to take Fusix.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had any condition that stops your bladder from emptying completely, diabetes, gout, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, a chronic inflammatory condition), or liver disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. Do not breast-feed while taking this medicine. If you become pregnant while taking Fusix, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, tell the doctor that you are using Fusix.
  • plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Fusix may make your skin sensitive to sunlight.
  • you should know that Fusix may cause dizziness, lightheadedness, and fainting when you get up too quickly from a lying position. This is more common when you first start taking Fusix. To avoid this problem, get out of bed slowly, resting your feet on the floor for a few minutes before standing up. Alcohol can add to these side effects.

What other drugs will affect Fusix?

Sometimes it is not safe to use certain medications at the same time. Some drugs can affect your blood levels of other drugs you take, which may increase side effects or make the medications less effective.

If you also take sucralfate, take your Fusix dose 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take sucralfate.

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

another diuretic, especially ethacrynic acid;

cancer medicine, such as cisplatin;

heart or blood pressure medicine; or

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with Fusix, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Fusix only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

Copyright 1996-2019 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 16.01.

2. Key facts

  • It's usual to take Fusix once a day in the morning. Some people take it twice a day - once in the morning and again at lunchtime.
  • Fusix doesn't usually upset your tummy. You can take it whether or not you've eaten a meal or snack recently.
  • The main side effect of Fusix is peeing more often than normal. Most people need to pee about 30 minutes after taking Fusix, and again within a few hours.
  • Do not take Fusix after 4pm or you may have to wake in the night to go to the toilet.
  • Fusix is also called by the brand names Frusol and Lasix.

Cancer drug

Taking this cancer drug with Fusix can increase your risk of kidney problems and hearing damage or loss:

Taking this cancer drug with Fusix can decrease the effects of Fusix. Also, Fusix may increase the amount of this drug in your body, which can increase side effects:

Beclouded eyesight, belly discomfort, hassle, lightheadedness, tingling, looseness of the bowels, numbness, and constipation are a couple of moderate side effects that you could simply disregard, as they will likely fade away on their very own. More serious negative effects can be peing less than clay-colored and usual stools and dark urine, effortlessly bleeding, weakness, fast heartbeat, effortlessly wounding, uneasyness, yellowing of your skin, lightheadedness, sleepiness, peeling off skin breakout, muscular tissue pain, and reduction of Fusix lasix. Make certain you report them to your physician when possible.

What is the most important information I should know about Fusix?

You should not use this medicine if you are unable to urinate.

Do not take more than your recommended dose. High doses of Fusix may cause irreversible hearing loss.

6. How to cope with s >

What to do about:

  • peeing more than normal - this will last for about 6 hours after taking Fusix. It's nothing to worry about, but if it's inconvenient for you, change the time you take Fusix to one that suits you better (provided it's no later than 4pm). If peeing a lot is still a problem for you, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.
  • feeling thirsty - it's important not to get dehydrated, but how much you drink will depend on why you're taking Fusix. Check with your doctor how much liquid you can drink while you're taking this medicine.
  • dry mouth - chew sugar-free gum or suck sugar-free sweets.
  • headaches - make sure you rest and drink fluids - ask your doctor how much you can drink while taking this medicine. Do not drink too much alcohol. Ask your pharmacist to recommend a painkiller. Talk to your doctor if the headaches last longer than a week or are severe.
  • feeling confused or dizzy - if Fusix makes you feel dizzy when you stand up, try getting up very slowly or stay sitting down until you feel better. If you begin to feel dizzy, lie down so that you don't faint, then sit until you feel better. Do not drive or use tools or machines while you're feeling dizzy or shaky.
  • muscle cramps or weak muscles - if you get unusual muscle pain or weakness which isn't from exercise or hard work, talk to your doctor. You may need a blood test to check what might be causing it.
  • feeling or being sick (nausea or vomiting) - take Fusix with or just after a meal or snack. Take small, regular sips of water or squash so you don't get dehydrated (ask your doctor how much fulid you can drink). It may help if you stick to simple meals and don't eat rich or spicy food. This side effect usually wears off after a few days. Talk to your doctor about taking an anti-sickness medicine if it carries on for longer.

How should I take Fusix?

Take Fusix exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose.

Fusix oral is taken by mouth. The injection is injected into a muscle or given as an infusion into a vein. A healthcare provider will give you this injection if you are unable to take the medicine by mouth.

You may receive your first dose in a hospital or clinic setting if you have severe liver disease.

Do not take more than your recommended dose. High doses of Fusix may cause irreversible hearing loss.

Measure liquid medicine carefully. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon).

Fusix doses are based on weight in children. Your child's dose needs may change if the child gains or loses weight.

Fusix will make you urinate more often and you may get dehydrated easily. Follow your doctor's instructions about using potassium supplements or getting enough salt and potassium in your diet.

Your blood pressure will need to be checked often and you may need other medical tests.

If you have high blood pressure, keep using this medicine even if you feel well. High blood pressure often has no symptoms. You may need to use blood pressure medicine for the rest of your life.

If you need surgery, tell the surgeon ahead of time that you are using this medicine.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Throw away any unused oral liquid after 90 days.

Lasix (Fusix) is a medicine that could be recommended to patients suffering from fluid retention and detected with cardiac arrest, kidney ailment or liver illness. This medicine can be additionally recommended for clients with high blood tension.

What are the possible side effects of Fusix?

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction (hives, difficult breathing, swelling in your face or throat) or a severe skin reaction (fever, sore throat, burning in your eyes, skin pain, red or purple skin rash that spreads and causes blistering and peeling).

Call your doctor at once if you have:

  • a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;
  • ringing in your ears, hearing loss;
  • muscle spasms or contractions;
  • pale skin, easy bruising, unusual bleeding;
  • high blood sugar--increased thirst, increased urination, dry mouth, fruity breath odor;
  • kidney problems--little or no urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath;
  • signs of liver or pancreas problems--loss of appetite, upper stomach pain (that may spread to your back), nausea or vomiting, dark urine, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or
  • signs of an electrolyte imbalance--dry mouth, thirst, weakness, drowsiness, feeling jittery or unsteady, vomiting, irregular heartbeats, fluttering in your chest, numbness or tingling, muscle cramps, muscle weakness or limp feeling.

Common side effects may include:

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Warnings for people with certain health conditions

For people with kidney problems: Fusix is removed from your body by your kidneys. If you have kidney problems, more of the drug may stay in your body longer. This could lead to dangerous side effects, including very low blood pressure. Your doctor may start you on a lower dose of this drug. Your doctor may also monitor how well your kidneys are working to make sure Fusix is safe for you to take.

For people with liver problems: If you have liver problems such as cirrhosis or ascites, it’s best to receive Fusix in the hospital. Fusix can cause very low electrolyte levels, which can cause serious liver damage and loss of brain function. (Electrolytes are minerals that help control the fluid balance in your body and help with other important functions.) Your doctor will monitor you closely.

For people with diabetes: Fusix can make it harder to control your blood sugar (glucose) levels. Before taking this drug, be sure your doctor knows you have diabetes.

For people with bladder disorders: If you have severe problems with emptying your bladder completely, Fusix can make your condition worse. Before taking this drug, be sure your doctor knows you have a bladder disorder.

For people with thyroid problems: High doses (over 80 mg) of Fusix can cause low levels of thyroid hormones. Be sure to tell your doctor about your thyroid problems before you start taking Fusix.

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Lasix (Fusix) is an anthranilic acid derivative that is used as a strong diuretic in adults and children to treat excessive fluid accumulation (edema) caused by congestive heart failure, liver failure, renal failure, and nephritic syndrome. Lasix may be used with antihypertensive drugs to control high blood pressure (hypertension). Lasix is available as a generic. Side effects of Lasix include:

Serious side effects of Lasix include:

Lasix is available in tablet (20 to 80 mg) and IV forms. Dosage is determined by the patient's physician and varies according to how much fluid and how fast the fluid should be removed. Patients with poor renal function usually require higher doses; doses in children are weight-based. Lasix may interact with sucralfate, cisplatin, cyclosporine, ethacrynic acid, lithium, methotrexate, phenytoin, antibiotics, heart or blood pressure medications, laxatives, salicylates such as aspirin, or steroids. Tell your doctor all medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant while using Lasix; it is unknown if it will harm a fetus. Lasix passes into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby. Lasix may also slow breast milk production. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding.

Our Lasix Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking Fusix?

You should not use Fusix if you are allergic to it, or if you are unable to urinate.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • kidney disease;
  • enlarged prostate, bladder obstruction, urination problems;
  • cirrhosis or other liver disease;
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of potassium or magnesium in your blood);
  • gout;
  • lupus;
  • diabetes; or
  • a sulfa drug allergy.

Tell your doctor if you have an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or any type of scan using a radioactive dye that is injected into your veins. Both contrast dyes and Fusix can harm your kidneys.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It may not be safe to breastfeed while using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risk. Fusix may slow breast milk production.

Why it's used

Fusix is used to treat hypertension (high blood pressure). It is also used to treat edema. This is swelling due to fluid buildup in the body. Edema can be caused by other medical conditions such as heart failure, cirrhosis of the liver, or kidney disease.

Fusix may be used as part of a combination therapy to treat high blood pressure. This means you may need to take it with other medications.


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