Reuprofen tablets

Reuprofen

  • Active Ingredient: Ibuprofen
  • 600 mg, 400 mg
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What is Reuprofen?

The active ingredient of Reuprofen brand is ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Used for

Reuprofen is used to treat diseases such as: Aseptic Necrosis, Back Pain, Chronic Myofascial Pain, Costochondritis, Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis, Dysautonomia, Fever, Frozen Shoulder, Gout, Acute, Headache, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Muscle Pain, Neck Pain, Osteoarthritis, Pain, Patent Ductus Arteriosus, Period Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, Radiculopathy, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sciatica, Spondylolisthesis, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, Toothache, Transverse Myelitis.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Reuprofen include: belching; paranoia; pale skin; clay-colored stools; unpleasant breath odor; troubled breathing at rest; weight gain.

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Before taking Reuprofen,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Reuprofen, aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ketoprofen and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), any other medications, or any of the inactive ingredients in the type of Reuprofen you plan to take. Ask your pharmacist or check the label on the package for a list of the inactive ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril, enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic), fosinopril, lisinopril (in Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon, in Prestalia), quinapril (Accupril, in Quinaretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); angiotensin receptor blockers such as candesartan (Atacand, in Atacand HCT), eprosartan (Teveten), irbesartan (Avapro, in Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, in Azor, in Benicar HCT, in Tribenzor), telmisartan (Micardis, in Micardis HCT, in Twynsta), and valsartan (in Exforge HCT); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin, in Tenoretic), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL, in Dutoprol), nadolol (Corgard, in Corzide), and propranolol (Hemangeol, Inderal, Innopran); diuretics ('water pills'); lithium (Lithobid); and methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you more carefully for side effects.
  • do not take nonprescription Reuprofen with any other medication for pain unless your doctor tells you that you should.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had any of the conditions mentioned in the IMPORTANT WARNING section or asthma, especially if you also have frequent stuffed or runny nose or nasal polyps (swelling of the inside of the nose); heart failure; swelling of the hands, arms, feet, ankles, or lower legs; lupus (a condition in which the body attacks many of its own tissues and organs, often including the skin, joints, blood, and kidneys); or liver or kidney disease. If you are giving Reuprofen to a child, tell the child's doctor if the child has not been drinking fluids or has lost a large amount of fluid from repeated vomiting or diarrhea.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the last few months of your pregnancy; you plan to become pregnant; or you are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking Reuprofen, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking Reuprofen.
  • if you have phenylketonuria (PKU, an inborn disease in which mental retardation develops if a specific diet is not followed), read the package label carefully before taking nonprescription Reuprofen. Some types of nonprescription Reuprofen may be sweetened with aspartame, a source of phenylalanine.

Drug interactions

Certain medications can increase your risk of having an overdose of Reuprofen.

Don’t take any of the following medications with Reuprofen without first consulting your doctor:

  • aspirin, because it may increase the risk of serious side effects
  • diuretics (water pills), due to an increased risk of kidney failure
  • lithium, due to an increased risk of toxicity
  • methotrexate, due to an increased risk of toxicity
  • anticoagulants (blood thinners), such as warfarin, because it can increase your risk of serious gastrointestinal bleeding

Mixing Reuprofen with alcohol can also increase your risk of having serious side effects, like stomach or intestinal bleeding.

Not everyone will experience symptoms of an Reuprofen overdose right away. Some people won’t have any visible symptoms at all.

If you do experience symptoms of an Reuprofen overdose, they’re usually mild. Mild symptoms may include:

  • tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
  • heartburn
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • diarrhea
  • dizziness
  • blurred vision
  • rash
  • sweating

Severe symptoms can include:

  • difficult or slow breathing
  • convulsions
  • hypotension (low blood pressure)
  • seizures
  • little to no urine production
  • severe headache
  • coma

Infants who overdose may show signs of lethargy (unresponsiveness) or apnea (temporary cessation of breathing) following a more serious overdose of Reuprofen.

If you or someone you know has taken more than the maximum recommended dose of Reuprofen, contact your local poison center. In the United States, you can reach the poison center by calling 1-800-222-1222. You can call this number 24 hours a day. Stay on the line for further instructions.

If possible, have the following information ready:

  • the person’s age, height, weight, and gender
  • how much Reuprofen was ingested
  • when the last dose was taken
  • if the person also took other drugs, supplements, or had any alcohol

You can also receive guidance by using the poison center’s webPOISONCONTROL online tool.

  • Text "POISON" to 797979 to save the contact information for poison control to your smartphone.

If you can’t access a phone or computer, go to the nearest emergency room immediately. Don’t wait until symptoms start. Some people who overdose on Reuprofen won’t show symptoms right away.

At the hospital, doctors will monitor breathing, heart rate, and other vital signs. A doctor may insert a tube through the mouth to look for internal bleeding.

You may also receive the following treatments:

  • medications that make you throw up
  • gastric lavage (stomach pumping), only if the drug was ingested within the last hour
  • activated charcoal
  • laxatives
  • breathing support, such as oxygen or a breathing machine (ventilator)
  • intravenous flu >

Increased drowsiness

Individually, both alcohol and Reuprofen can cause drowsiness. Combining the two may make this drowsiness worse, which can lead to excessive sleepiness or an inability to function normally.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that it is never safe to drink alcohol and drive. The reason for this is that alcohol slows down reaction times and impairs coordination.

Reuprofen preparations

  • Tablets: 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg
  • Chewable tablets: 50 and 100 mg; Suspension: 100 mg/5 ml and 40 mg/ml
  • Intravenous solution: 10 mg/ml, 100 mg/ml

Reuprofen is an effective pain reliever, but taking too much of it can cause serious side effects. This is true in both the short- and the long-term.

Reuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). People take Reuprofen to treat pain, fever, and inflammation. It is one of the most used medications in the world.

A small overdose can cause minor symptoms. In rare cases, overdoses can be fatal. If a person has taken too much Reuprofen, they should call Poison Control on 1-800-222-1222 or the emergency services on 911.

In this article, we explore how to take Reuprofen safely and the effects of taking too much.

Before taking this medicine

Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Reuprofen may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using Reuprofen, especially in older adults.

You should not use Reuprofen if you are allergic to it, or if you have ever had an asthma attack, hives, or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin, acetaminophen, or an NSAID e.g. celecoxib, diclofenac, naprosyn, and others.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

heart disease, high blood pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke;

a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot ;

a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;

liver or kidney disease;

fluid retention; or

a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome , Sjogren's syndrome, or lupus.

Taking Reuprofen during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby.Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether Reuprofen passes into breast milk or if it could affect a nursing baby. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are breastfeeding.

Do not give Reuprofen to a child younger than 2 years old without the advice of a doctor.

Kidney toxicity

Kidney failure can occur in both children and adults who overdose with Reuprofen. However, it is not common.

A review of Reuprofen toxicity, which the authors updated in 2019, includes a 1992 study that scientists conducted at the Rocky Mountain Poison Control Center in Denver, CO. It showed that only 2 out of 63 people who overdosed with Reuprofen experienced symptoms of kidney failure.

In most cases, healthcare professionals can reverse kidney failure from ingestion of a large dosage of Reuprofen.

Many people are aware that taking Reuprofen at the same time as alcohol is not always safe, but what are the risks, and when is it dangerous?

Reuprofen is an over-the-counter medication that people use to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It is available under various brand names, such as Advil and Motrin, and in some combination medications for colds and the flu.

Alcohol and Reuprofen can both irritate the lining of the stomach and intestines. Mixing the two can cause side effects that vary in severity from mild to serious depending on the dose and how much alcohol a person ingests.

In this article, we discuss the safety and risks of taking Reuprofen and alcohol together. We also cover other side effects of Reuprofen.


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