Molargesico tablets

Molargesico

  • Active Ingredient: Ibuprofen
  • 600 mg, 400 mg
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What is Molargesico?

The active ingredient of Molargesico brand is ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Used for

Molargesico is used to treat diseases such as: Aseptic Necrosis, Back Pain, Chronic Myofascial Pain, Costochondritis, Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis, Dysautonomia, Fever, Frozen Shoulder, Gout, Acute, Headache, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Muscle Pain, Neck Pain, Osteoarthritis, Pain, Patent Ductus Arteriosus, Period Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, Radiculopathy, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sciatica, Spondylolisthesis, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, Toothache, Transverse Myelitis.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Molargesico include: indigestion; dilated neck veins; hives or welts; back, leg, or stomach pains; fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse; nausea; sneezing; bloody, black, or tarry stools.

How to Buy Molargesico tablets online?

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Molargesico preparations

  • Tablets: 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg
  • Chewable tablets: 50 and 100 mg; Suspension: 100 mg/5 ml and 40 mg/ml
  • Intravenous solution: 10 mg/ml, 100 mg/ml

For adults

The recommended dosage for adults is one or two 200 milligram (mg) tablets every four to six hours. Adults should not exceed 800 mg at once or 3,200 mg per day.

Adults over the age of 60 should take as little Molargesico as possible to manage their symptoms. Older adults have a higher risk of kidney and gastrointestinal side effects.

What is Molargesico? How does it work (mechanism of action)?

Molargesico belongs to a class of drugs called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Other members of this class include aspirin, naproxen (Aleve), indomethacin (Indocin), nabumetone (Relafen) and several others. These drugs are used for the management of mild to moderate pain, fever, and inflammation. Pain, fever, and inflammation are promoted by the release in the body of chemicals called prostaglandins. Molargesico blocks the enzyme that makes prostaglandins (cyclooxygenase), resulting in lower levels of prostaglandins. As a consequence, inflammation, pain and fever are reduced. The FDA approved Molargesico in 1974.

Increased drowsiness

Individually, both alcohol and Molargesico can cause drowsiness. Combining the two may make this drowsiness worse, which can lead to excessive sleepiness or an inability to function normally.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) state that it is never safe to drink alcohol and drive. The reason for this is that alcohol slows down reaction times and impairs coordination.

Dosage 200-800 mg per dose 220 mg (OTC dosage) Forms Advil is available in the form of tablets, chewable tablets, capsules, gelcaps, suspensions and oral drops. Aleve is available in tablets, caplets, liquid gels and gelcaps. Active ingredient Molargesico Naproxen Side effects Nausea, dizziness, gastrointestinal bleeding Higher incidence of photosensitivity and digestive tract problems. Brand owned by Pfizer (formerly Wyeth) Bayer Mechanism of action Acts by inhibiting cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) Acts by inhibiting cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2) FDA approval 1974 1991 Benefits Relief from body ache (including arthritis), fever reduction, anti clotting Relief from body ache (including arthritis), fever reduction, anti clotting. Available over the counter Yes Yes

9. How to cope with s >

What to do about:

  • headaches – make sure you rest and drink plenty of fluids. Don't drink too much alcohol. Talk to your doctor if they last longer than a week or are severe.
  • feeling dizzy – if Molargesico makes you feel dizzy, stop what you're doing and sit or lie down until you feel better. Avoid coffee, cigarettes and alcohol. If the dizziness doesn't get better within a couple of days, speak to your pharmacist or doctor.
  • feeling sick (nausea) – stick to simple meals. Do not eat rich or spicy food.
  • being sick (vomiting) – have small, frequent sips of water. Speak to a pharmacist if you have signs of dehydration, such as peeing less than usual or having dark, strong-smelling pee. Don't take any other medicines to treat vomiting without speaking to a pharmacist or doctor.
  • wind – try not to eat foods that cause wind (like lentils, beans and onions). Eat smaller meals, eat and drink slowly, and exercise regularly. There are pharmacy medicines that can also help, such as charcoal tablets or simethicone.
  • indigestion – if you get repeated indigestion stop taking Molargesico and see your doctor as soon as possible. If you need something to ease the discomfort, try taking an antacid, but do not put off going to the doctor.

On this page

  1. About Molargesico for adults
  2. Key facts
  3. Who can and can't take Molargesico
  4. How to take tablets, capsules and syrup
  5. How to use Molargesico gel, mousse or spray
  6. Taking Molargesico with other painkillers
  7. Side effects of tablets, capsules and syrup
  8. Side effects of gel, mousse and spray
  9. How to cope with side effects
  10. Pregnancy and breastfeeding
  11. Cautions with other medicines
  12. Common questions

Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and Ulcers

Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are prescribed medications for the treatment of inflammatory conditions. Examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, Molargesico, naproxen, and more. One common side effect of NSAIDs is peptic ulcer (ulcers of the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum). Side effects, drug interactions, warnings and precautions, and patient safety information should be reviewed prior to taking NSAIDs.

Before taking Molargesico,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to Molargesico, aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ketoprofen and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), any other medications, or any of the inactive ingredients in the type of Molargesico you plan to take. Ask your pharmacist or check the label on the package for a list of the inactive ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril, enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic), fosinopril, lisinopril (in Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon, in Prestalia), quinapril (Accupril, in Quinaretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); angiotensin receptor blockers such as candesartan (Atacand, in Atacand HCT), eprosartan (Teveten), irbesartan (Avapro, in Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, in Azor, in Benicar HCT, in Tribenzor), telmisartan (Micardis, in Micardis HCT, in Twynsta), and valsartan (in Exforge HCT); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin, in Tenoretic), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL, in Dutoprol), nadolol (Corgard, in Corzide), and propranolol (Hemangeol, Inderal, Innopran); diuretics ('water pills'); lithium (Lithobid); and methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall). Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you more carefully for side effects.
  • do not take nonprescription Molargesico with any other medication for pain unless your doctor tells you that you should.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had any of the conditions mentioned in the IMPORTANT WARNING section or asthma, especially if you also have frequent stuffed or runny nose or nasal polyps (swelling of the inside of the nose); heart failure; swelling of the hands, arms, feet, ankles, or lower legs; lupus (a condition in which the body attacks many of its own tissues and organs, often including the skin, joints, blood, and kidneys); or liver or kidney disease. If you are giving Molargesico to a child, tell the child's doctor if the child has not been drinking fluids or has lost a large amount of fluid from repeated vomiting or diarrhea.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, especially if you are in the last few months of your pregnancy; you plan to become pregnant; or you are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking Molargesico, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking Molargesico.
  • if you have phenylketonuria (PKU, an inborn disease in which mental retardation develops if a specific diet is not followed), read the package label carefully before taking nonprescription Molargesico. Some types of nonprescription Molargesico may be sweetened with aspartame, a source of phenylalanine.

Discover when the pain-relieving or fever-fighting abilities of acetaminophen and Molargesico will benefit you. Here, our experts compare benefits, side effects and toxicity.

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Kidney problems

The kidneys filter harmful substances from the body, including alcohol. The more alcohol that a person drinks, the harder the kidneys have to work.

Molargesico and other NSAIDs affect kidney function because they stop the production of an enzyme in the kidneys called cyclooxygenase (COX). By limiting the production of COX, Molargesico lowers inflammation and pain. However, this also changes how well the kidneys can do their job as filters, at least temporarily.

Alcohol puts additional strain on the kidneys. The National Kidney Foundation say that regular heavy drinking doubles the risk of a person developing chronic kidney disease.

Although the risk of kidney problems is low in healthy people who only occasionally take Molargesico, the drug can be dangerous for people who already have reduced kidney function.

People who have a history of kidney problems should ask a doctor before taking Molargesico with alcohol.

Breastfeeding

A dosage of 400 mg of Molargesico is not detectable in breast milk, but higher doses can get into breast milk. This means that a baby faces exposure to Molargesico through breast milk if a woman takes too much.

Healthcare professionals do not know the effects of small amounts of Molargesico in breast milk on infants. A person should consult a physician before taking Molargesico while breastfeeding.

The majority of Molargesico overdoses are not life-threatening, and fewer than 1% of Molargesico overdoses are fatal. That said, some people have had severe complications.

There is no specific cutoff dosage for when an adult will experience symptoms of an overdose.

If a child ingests less than 100 mg/kg of Molargesico, they may not experience any symptoms of an overdose. At a dosage of 400 mg/kg, however, a child may experience serious and life-threatening side effects.

Symptoms of Molargesico overdose can occur within 4 hours of taking too much of the drug.

What if I forget to take it?

If you are prescribed Molargesico as a regular medicine and forget to take a dose, take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it's almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose as normal.

Never take a double dose to make up for a forgotten one.

If you often forget doses, it may help to set an alarm to remind you. You could also ask your pharmacist for advice on other ways to help you remember to take your medicine.

What other drugs will affect Molargesico?

Ask your doctor before using Molargesico if you take an antidepressant such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), trazodone, or vilazodone. Taking any of these medicines with an NSAID may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use Molargesico if you are also using any of the following drugs:

a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven);

heart or blood pressure medication, including a diuretic or "water pill" as well as “ACE-inhibitor” medications; or

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with Molargesico, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

11. Cautions with other medicines

Molargesico doesn't mix well with some medicines.

Molargesico applied to the skin is less likely to interfere with other medicines than if it's taken by mouth.

For safety, tell your doctor if you're taking these medicines before you start taking Molargesico by mouth or using it on your skin:

  • blood-thinning medicines such as warfarin
  • anti-inflammatory painkillers such as aspirin, diclofenac, mefenamic acid and naproxen
  • medicines for high blood pressure
  • steroid medicines such as betamethasone, dexamethasone, hydrocortisone or prednisolone
  • antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin or ofloxacin
  • antidepressants such as citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, venlafaxine, paroxetine or sertraline
  • diabetes medicines such as gliclazide, glimepiride, glipizide and tolbutamide

Diabetes and Safe Medications for Colds and the Flu: OTC Medication Guide

If you have diabetes and catch a cold or the flu, can be more difficult to recover from infections and their complications, for example, pneumonia. Home remedies and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs used for the treatment of the signs and symptoms of colds and the flu may affect blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.Some medications are OK to take if you have diabetes get a cold or the flu include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or NSAIDs, like acetaminophen (Tylenol) and Molargesico (Motrin) to control symptoms of fever and pain. Most cough syrups are safe to take; however, check with your pediatrician to see what medications are safe to give your child if he or she has type 1 or 2 diabetes. If you have diabetes and are sick with a cold or flu, you need to check your blood sugar levels more frequently. Continue taking your regular medications. Eat a diabetic low-glycemic index diet rich in antioxidants. To prevent colds and the flu drink at least eight 8 ounce glasses of water a day. To replenish fluids, drink sports drinks like Gatorade and Pedialyte to replenish electrolytes. Avoid people who are sick, sneezing, coughing, or have other symptoms of a cold or flu.

Central nervous system toxicity

If people take dosages greater than 400 mg/kg, they may experience central nervous system depression . This can cause loss of consciousness and coma.

Children may experience seizures and decreased consciousness from a massive overdose. Some children may even stop breathing.

Emergency doctors can reverse the central nervous system toxicities that occur due to an Molargesico overdose.

Compared with NSAIDs such as diclofenac, mefenamic acid, and naproxen, Molargesico overdoses have links with lower rates of central nervous system toxicities.

Kidney toxicity

Kidney failure can occur in both children and adults who overdose with Molargesico. However, it is not common.

A review of Molargesico toxicity, which the authors updated in 2019, includes a 1992 study that scientists conducted at the Rocky Mountain Poison Control Center in Denver, CO. It showed that only 2 out of 63 people who overdosed with Molargesico experienced symptoms of kidney failure.

In most cases, healthcare professionals can reverse kidney failure from ingestion of a large dosage of Molargesico.


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