Gyno-Neuralgin tablets

Gyno-Neuralgin

  • Active Ingredient: Ibuprofen
  • 600 mg, 400 mg
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What is Gyno-Neuralgin?

The active ingredient of Gyno-Neuralgin brand is ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Ibuprofen works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Used for

Gyno-Neuralgin is used to treat diseases such as: Aseptic Necrosis, Back Pain, Chronic Myofascial Pain, Costochondritis, Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis, Dysautonomia, Fever, Frozen Shoulder, Gout, Acute, Headache, Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis, Muscle Pain, Neck Pain, Osteoarthritis, Pain, Patent Ductus Arteriosus, Period Pain, Plantar Fasciitis, Radiculopathy, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Sciatica, Spondylolisthesis, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, Toothache, Transverse Myelitis.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Gyno-Neuralgin include: mood or other mental changes; dizziness; quick to react or overreact; troubled breathing at rest; lack of appetite.

How to Buy Gyno-Neuralgin tablets online?

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5. How to use Gyno-Neuralgin gel, mousse or spray

The amount of Gyno-Neuralgin you put on your skin depends on the product you're using – check the package leaflet carefully for how much to use.

Gently massage the Gyno-Neuralgin into the painful area 3 or 4 times a day. Leave at least 4 hours between applications, and do not put it on more than 4 times in 24 hours.

Never use Gyno-Neuralgin gel, mousse or spray on your eyes, mouth, lips, nose or genital area. Do not put it on sore or broken skin. Do not put plasters or dressings over skin you've applied Gyno-Neuralgin to.

Gyno-Neuralgin preparations

  • Tablets: 100, 200, 400, 600, and 800 mg
  • Chewable tablets: 50 and 100 mg; Suspension: 100 mg/5 ml and 40 mg/ml
  • Intravenous solution: 10 mg/ml, 100 mg/ml

Stomach ulcers and bleeding

Gyno-Neuralgin can irritate the digestive tract, which is why doctors tell people to take this medication with food. When a person takes Gyno-Neuralgin for an extended period or in high doses, it can increase their risk of gastric ulcers or bleeding in the digestive tract.

Alcohol can also irritate the stomach and digestive tract. Mixing the two further increases the risk of ulcers and bleeding.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) state that Gyno-Neuralgin can interact with alcohol, which can worsen the usual side effects of Gyno-Neuralgin. These side effects can include bleeding, ulcers, and a rapid heartbeat.

Research shows that both drinking alcohol and taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), which is the class of drug that includes Gyno-Neuralgin, are risk factors for stomach ulcer bleeding.

The risk of stomach ulcer bleeding increases the longer a person takes Gyno-Neuralgin. A person who takes Gyno-Neuralgin every day for several months has a higher risk of this symptom than someone who takes Gyno-Neuralgin once a week.

Other uses for this medicine

Gyno-Neuralgin is also sometimes used to treat ankylosing spondylitis (arthritis that mainly affects the spine), gouty arthritis (joint pain caused by a build-up of certain substances in the joints), and psoriatic arthritis (arthritis that occurs with a long-lasting skin disease that causes scaling and swelling). Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this drug for your condition.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Many people are aware that taking Gyno-Neuralgin at the same time as alcohol is not always safe, but what are the risks, and when is it dangerous?

Gyno-Neuralgin is an over-the-counter medication that people use to reduce pain, inflammation, and fever. It is available under various brand names, such as Advil and Motrin, and in some combination medications for colds and the flu.

Alcohol and Gyno-Neuralgin can both irritate the lining of the stomach and intestines. Mixing the two can cause side effects that vary in severity from mild to serious depending on the dose and how much alcohol a person ingests.

In this article, we discuss the safety and risks of taking Gyno-Neuralgin and alcohol together. We also cover other side effects of Gyno-Neuralgin.

Kidney problems

The kidneys filter harmful substances from the body, including alcohol. The more alcohol that a person drinks, the harder the kidneys have to work.

Gyno-Neuralgin and other NSAIDs affect kidney function because they stop the production of an enzyme in the kidneys called cyclooxygenase (COX). By limiting the production of COX, Gyno-Neuralgin lowers inflammation and pain. However, this also changes how well the kidneys can do their job as filters, at least temporarily.

Alcohol puts additional strain on the kidneys. The National Kidney Foundation say that regular heavy drinking doubles the risk of a person developing chronic kidney disease.

Although the risk of kidney problems is low in healthy people who only occasionally take Gyno-Neuralgin, the drug can be dangerous for people who already have reduced kidney function.

People who have a history of kidney problems should ask a doctor before taking Gyno-Neuralgin with alcohol.

What other drugs will affect Gyno-Neuralgin?

Ask your doctor before using Gyno-Neuralgin if you take an antidepressant such as citalopram, escitalopram, fluoxetine (Prozac), fluvoxamine, paroxetine, sertraline (Zoloft), trazodone, or vilazodone. Taking any of these medicines with an NSAID may cause you to bruise or bleed easily.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to use Gyno-Neuralgin if you are also using any of the following drugs:

a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin, Jantoven);

heart or blood pressure medication, including a diuretic or "water pill" as well as “ACE-inhibitor” medications; or

This list is not complete. Other drugs may interact with Gyno-Neuralgin, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible interactions are listed in this medication guide.

6. Taking Gyno-Neuralgin with other painkillers

It's safe to take Gyno-Neuralgin with paracetamol or codeine.

But do not take Gyno-Neuralgin with similar painkillers like aspirin or naproxen without talking to a pharmacist or doctor.

Gyno-Neuralgin, aspirin and naproxen belong to the same group of medicines called non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). If you take them together, Gyno-Neuralgin plus aspirin or naproxen may increase the chance of you getting side effects like stomach ache.

NSAIDs are also used in medicines you can buy from pharmacies – for example, cough and cold remedies. Before taking any other medicines, check the label to see if they contain aspirin, Gyno-Neuralgin or other NSAIDs.

Duration of Effectiveness

In a double-blind study, it was found that 12 hours after the dose was administered naproxen sodium (Aleve) was significantly more effective in relieving pain than Gyno-Neuralgin (Advil).

Discover when the pain-relieving or fever-fighting abilities of acetaminophen and Gyno-Neuralgin will benefit you. Here, our experts compare benefits, side effects and toxicity.

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Before taking this medicine

Do not use this medicine just before or after heart bypass surgery (coronary artery bypass graft, or CABG).

Gyno-Neuralgin may also cause stomach or intestinal bleeding, which can be fatal. These conditions can occur without warning while you are using Gyno-Neuralgin, especially in older adults.

You should not use Gyno-Neuralgin if you are allergic to it, or if you have ever had an asthma attack, hives, or severe allergic reaction after taking aspirin, acetaminophen, or an NSAID e.g. celecoxib, diclofenac, naprosyn, and others.

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take this medicine if you have:

heart disease, high blood pressure , high cholesterol, diabetes, or if you smoke;

a history of heart attack, stroke, or blood clot ;

a history of stomach ulcers or bleeding;

liver or kidney disease;

fluid retention; or

a connective tissue disease such as Marfan syndrome , Sjogren's syndrome, or lupus.

Taking Gyno-Neuralgin during the last 3 months of pregnancy may harm the unborn baby.Do not use this medicine without a doctor's advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether Gyno-Neuralgin passes into breast milk or if it could affect a nursing baby. Ask a doctor before using this medicine if you are breastfeeding.

Do not give Gyno-Neuralgin to a child younger than 2 years old without the advice of a doctor.

Gyno-Neuralgin side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction to Gyno-Neuralgin: rash or hives; sneezing, runny or stuffy nose; wheezing or trouble breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of a heart attack or stroke: chest pain spreading to your jaw or shoulder, sudden numbness or weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, leg swelling, feeling short of breath.

Stop using Gyno-Neuralgin and call your doctor at once if you have:

changes in your vision;

shortness of breath (even with mild exertion);

swelling or rapid weight gain;

the first sign of any skin rash, no matter how mild;

signs of stomach bleeding - bloody or tarry stools, coughing up blood or vomit that looks like coffee grounds;

liver problems - nausea, upper stomach pain, itching, tired feeling, flu-like symptoms, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes);

kidney problems - little or no urinating, painful or difficult urination, swelling in your feet or ankles, feeling tired or short of breath;

low red blood cells (anemia) - pale skin, feeling light-headed or short of breath, rap >heart rate , trouble concentrating; or

severe skin reaction - fever, sore throat , swelling in your face or tongue, burning in your eyes, skin pain followed by a red or purple skin rash that spreads (especially in the face or upper body) and causes blistering and peeling.

Common Gyno-Neuralgin side effects may include:

upset stomach, mild heartburn, nausea, vomiting;

bloating, gas, diarrhea, constipation ;

dizziness , headache, nervousness ;

mild itching or rash; or

ringing in your ears.

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

If you are taking Gyno-Neuralgin on a regular basis, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Foot Pain

Foot pain may be caused by injuries (sprains, strains, bruises, and fractures), diseases (diabetes, Hansen disease, and gout), viruses, fungi, and bacteria (plantar warts and athlete's foot), or even ingrown toenails. Pain and tenderness may be accompanied by joint looseness, swelling, weakness, discoloration, and loss of function. Minor foot pain can usually be treated with rest, ice, compression, and elevation and OTC medications such as acetaminophen and Gyno-Neuralgin. Severe pain should be treated by a medical professional.


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