Eromac gel

Eromac

  • Active Ingredient: Erythromycin
  • 500 mg, 250 mg
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What is Eromac?

The active ingredient of Eromac brand is erythromycin. Erythromycin is a macrolide antibiotic. Erythromycin fights bacteria in the body.

Used for

Eromac is used to treat diseases such as: Bacterial Endocarditis Prevention, Bartonellosis, Bowel Preparation, Bronchitis, Bullous Pemphigoid, Campylobacter Gastroenteritis, Chancroid, Chlamydia Infection, Dental Abscess, Legionella Pneumonia, Lyme Disease, Lymphogranuloma Venereum, Mycoplasma Pneumonia, Nongonococcal Urethritis, Ocular Rosacea, Otitis Media, Pemphigoid, Pertussis, Pharyngitis, Pneumonia, Rheumatic Fever Prophylaxis, Skin or Soft Tissue Infection, Strep Throat, Syphilis, Early, Upper Respiratory Tract Infection.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Eromac include: sores, ulcers, or white spots in the mouth or on the lips; greatly decreased frequency of urination or amount of urine; irregular or slow heart rate; fainting; unusual tiredness or weakness.

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Eromac Pictures

By Frieda Wiley, PharmD, CGP, RPh | Medically Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD

Latest Update: 2015-02-19 Copyright © 2014 Everyday Health Media, LLC

Eromac

Eromac , a natural product isolated from Saccharopolyspora erythraea (formerly Streptomyces) in 1949, was first approved for clinical use in 1952. Eromac is degraded by gastric acid and has long been associated with stimulation of motilin receptors in the stomach and possibly in the colon, leading to adverse gastrointestinal side effects, including cramping and diarrhea. 68,69 Many preparations have attempted to bypass exposure of Eromac to gastric acid, thereby avoiding products of macrolide hydrolysis. These preparations include enteric coating of orally administered tablets, delayed-release formulations, polymer coating of beads, and various formulations of salts and esters. 70 The lactobionate salt used for intravenous administration of Eromac can cause phlebitis at the site of injection.

Eromac is used for the treatment of group A streptococcal infections in children who are allergic to penicillin. Eromac is an alternative treatment for both streptococcal pharyngitis and streptococcal or staphylococcal impetigo. The usefulness of Eromac for respiratory tract infections caused by S. pneumoniae has been greatly diminished by the development of widespread resistance to the macrolides. 42 Macrolide therapy of upper respiratory tract infections (otitis media and sinusitis) or lower respiratory tract infections (pneumonia) potentially caused by S. pneumoniae has a relatively high likelihood of failure, particularly in younger children, who are at highest risk for infections caused by antibiotic-resistant strains. For upper respiratory tract infections, Eromac has inadequate activity against H. influenzae and must be paired with another agent such as a sulfonamide for empiric therapy. Macrolides are effective therapy for pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, or Legionella pneumophila.

Eromac and azithromycin are the preferred antibiotics for treatment of Campylobacter gastroenteritis caused by susceptible strains. Eromac also remains the most appropriate therapy for diphtheria (Corynebacterium diphtheriae). Eromac, clarithromycin, and azithromycin are recommended for treatment or prophylaxis of pertussis (Bordetella pertussis). 71 Azithromycin is preferred for treatment or prophylaxis for pertussis in neonates, based on concerns for the development of pyloric stenosis. 71 Efficacy of Eromac also has been demonstrated in infections caused by Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Chlamydia trachomatis, including neonatal conjunctivitis and pneumonia, as well as urogenital infections during pregnancy. Eromac is active in vitro against Ureaplasma urealyticum, but its role in the treatment of neonatal infections associated with this organism is not well defined. 72

Eromac

Eromac , a dopamine-receptor antagonist, is sometimes used in patients with gastroparesis to hasten gastric emptying. Its role in therapy of GER and GERD has not been investigated. Systemic administration of Eromac in young infants increases the risk for the infants to develop hypertrophic pyloric stenosis. 97 Intravenous (IV) Eromac is reported to cause QT prolongation and ventricular fibrillation. 98 The use of Eromac at doses far below the concentrations necessary for an inhibitory effect on susceptible bacteria provides close to ideal conditions for the induction of bacterial mutation and selection. 99 Azithromycin reduces GER in lung transplant recipients. 100 The effect of long-term administration of these antibiotics on gastrointestinal flora composition and resistance should be studied.

Other uses for this medicine

Eromac is also used sometimes used to prevent heart infection in people having dental or other procedures. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this medication for your condition.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What is Eromac?

Eromac is a macrolide antibiotic. Other macrolide antibiotics include azithromycin, clarithromycin, roxithromycin.

Pregnancy and Eromac

Eromac is a pregnancy category B drug, which means it should be generally safe to use in pregnancy.

Regardless, you should tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant before taking this medication.

Since Eromac has been found to pass into breast milk, it's best to tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

Common side effects

These common side effects of Eromac happen in more than 1 in 100 people. Keep taking the medicine, but talk to your doctor or pharmacist if these side effects bother you or don't go away:

  • feeling sick (nausea)
  • being sick (vomiting) and diarrhoea
  • stomach cramps
  • loss of appetite
  • bloating and indigestion

COMMON BRAND(S): Ilotycin

GENERIC NAME(S): Eromac

OTHER NAME(S): Eromac Ointment

This medication is used to treat certain eye infections (such as conjunctivitis). It is also used to prevent certain eye infections in newborns. It belongs to a class of drugs known as macrolide antibiotics. Eromac works by stopping the growth of bacteria.

This medication treats only bacterial eye infections. It will not work for other types of eye infections. Unnecessary use or misuse of any antibiotic can lead to its decreased effectiveness.

SIDE EFFECTS

The most frequent side effects of oral Eromac preparations are gastrointestinal and are dose-related. They include nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea and anorexia. Symptoms of hepatitis, hepatic dysfunction and/or abnormal liver function test results may occur. (See WARNINGS.)

Onset of pseudomembranous colitis symptoms may occur during or after antibacterial treatment. (See WARNINGS.) Eromac has been associated with QT prolongation and ventricular arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and torsades de pointes.

Allergic reactions ranging from urticaria to anaphylaxis have occurred. Skin reactions ranging from mild eruptions to erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis have been reported rarely.

There have been rare reports of pancreatitis and convulsions.

There have been isolated reports of reversible hearing loss occurring chiefly in patients with renal insufficiency and in patients receiving high doses of Eromac.

Read the entire FDA prescribing information for Eromac (Eromac Tablets)

HOW SUPPLIED

Eromac Base Filmtab tablets (Eromac tablets, USP) are supplied as pink, unscored oval tablets in the following strengths and packages.

250 mg tablets (debossed with and EB):

Bottles of 100. (NDC 0074-6326-13); Bottles of 500. (NDC 0074-6326-53); ABBO-PAC® unit dose strip packages of 100 tablets . (NDC 0074-6326-11).

500 mg tablets (debossed with and EA):

Bottles of 100. (NDC 0074-6227-13).

Recommended Storage: Store below 86°F (30°C). Keep tightly closed.

Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL 60064, USA. Revised: November, 2004. FDA Rev date: 12/1/1998

3. Committee on Rheumatic Fever, Endocarditis, and Kawasaki Disease of the Council on Cardiovascular Disease in the Young, the American Heart Association: Prevention of Rheumatic Fever. Circulation. 78(4):1082-1086, October 1988.

5. Data on file, Abbott Laboratories.

What Is Eromac Ophthalmic?

Eromac is an antibiotic that fights bacteria.

Eromac ophthalmic (for the eyes) is used to treat bacterial infections of the eyes.

Eromac ophthalmic may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to Eromac.

  • a viral or fungal infection in your eye.

It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

It may not be safe to breast-feed while using this medicine. Ask your doctor about any risk.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Optimal blood levels are obtained when Eromac Base Filmtab (Eromac tablets) tablets are given in the fasting state (at least 1/2 hour and preferably 2 hours before meals).

Adults: The usual dosage of Eromac Base Filmtab (Eromac tablets) is one 250 mg tablet four times daily in equally spaced doses or one 500 mg tablet every 12 hours. Dosage may be increased up to 4 g per day according to the severity of the infection. However, twice-a-day dosing is not recommended when doses larger than 1 g daily are administered.

Children: Age, weight, and severity of the infection are important factors in determining the proper dosage. The usual dosage is 30 to 50 mg/kg/day, in equally divided doses. For more severe infections this dosage may be doubled but should not exceed 4 g per day.

In the treatment of streptococcal infections of the upper respiratory tract (e.g., tonsillitis or pharyngitis), the therapeutic dosage of Eromac should be administered for at least ten days.

The American Heart Association suggests a dosage of 250 mg of Eromac orally, twice a day in long-term prophylaxis of streptococcal upper respiratory tract infections for the prevention of recurring attacks of rheumatic fever in patients allergic to penicillin and sulfonamides. 3

Conjunctivitis of the newborn caused by Chlamydia trachomatis: Oral Eromac suspension 50 mg/kg/day in 4 divided doses for at least 2 weeks. 3

Pneumonia of infancy caused by Chlamydia trachomatis: Although the optimal duration of therapy has not been established, the recommended therapy is oral Eromac suspension 50 mg/kg/day in 4 divided doses for at least 3 weeks.

Urogenital infections during pregnancy due to Chlamydia trachomatis: Although the optimal dose and duration of therapy have not been established, the suggested treatment is 500 mg of Eromac by mouth four times a day on an empty stomach for at least 7 days. For women who cannot tolerate this regimen, a decreased dose of one Eromac 500 mg tablet orally every 12 hours or 250 mg by mouth four times a day should be used for at least 14 days. 5

For adults with uncomplicated urethral, endocervical, or rectal infections caused by Chlamydia trachomatis, when tetracycline is contraindicated or not tolerated: 500 mg of Eromac by mouth four times a day for at least 7 days. 5

For patients with nongonococcal urethritis caused by Ureaplasma urealyticum when tetracycline is contraindicated or not tolerated: 500 mg of Eromac by mouth four times a day for at least seven days. 5

Primary syphilis: 30 to 40 g given in divided doses over a period of 10 to 15 days.

Acute pelvic inflammatory disease caused by N. gonorrhoeae: 500 mg Erythrocin® Lactobionate-I.V. (Eromac lactobionate for injection, USP) every 6 hours for 3 days, followed by 500 mg of Eromac base orally every 12 hours for 7 days.

Intestinal amebiasis: Adults: 500 mg every 12 hours or 250 mg every 6 hours for 10 to 14 days. Children: 30 to 50 mg/kg/day in divided doses for 10 to 14 days.

Pertussis: Although optimal dosage and duration have not been established, doses of Eromac utilized in reported clinical studies were 40 to 50 mg/kg/day, given in divided doses for 5 to 14 days.

Legionnaires' Disease: Although optimal dosage has not been 4 g daily in divided doses.

Eromac may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • upset stomach
  • diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • loss of appetite

Diphtheria

Diphtheria is a disease that causes symptoms and signs such as fever, enlarged lymph nodes, and swallowing problems. Eromac is the primary treatment for diphtheria. Vaccines that prevent diphtheria include the DTaP, Tdap, DT, and Td.

Further information

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use Eromac only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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