Lora-Lich tablets

Lora-Lich

  • Active Ingredient: Loratadine
  • 10 mg
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What is Lora-Lich?

The active ingredient of Lora-Lich brand is loratadine. Loratadine is an antihistamine that reduces the effects of natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose.

Used for

Lora-Lich is used to treat diseases such as: Allergic Reactions, Allergic Rhinitis, Urticaria.

Side Effect

Possible side effects of Lora-Lich include: ; ; ; ; .

How to Buy Lora-Lich tablets online?

To buy Lora-Lich online - just click on the "Buy Now" button in the top and follow on to our shop. Order and payment takes a couple of minutes, and all measures are obvious. We do not require a medical prescription plus we have many methods of payment. Considering all the details of fast delivery and confidentiality, then you may read on the applicable pages on the links in the top menu.

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Immediate action required: Call 999 or go to A&E if:

  • you get a skin rash that may include itchy, red, swollen, blistered or peeling skin
  • you're wheezing
  • you get tightness in the chest or throat
  • you have trouble breathing or talking
  • your mouth, face, lips, tongue or throat start swelling

You could be having a serious allergic reaction and may need immediate treatment in hospital.

These are not all the side effects of Lora-Lich. For a full list see the leaflet inside your medicines packet.

You can report any suspected side effect to the UK safety scheme.

3. Who can and can't take Lora-Lich

Lora-Lich can be taken by adults and children aged 2 years and older.

Lora-Lich isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you:

  • have had an allergy to Lora-Lich or any other medicines in the past
  • have severe liver failure
  • have an intolerance to, or cannot absorb, some sugars such as lactose or sucrose
  • have epilepsy or another illness that puts you at risk of fits
  • have a rare illness called porphyria
  • are booked to have an allergy test – taking Lora-Lich may affect the results so you might need to stop taking it a few days before the test

Q: I keep sneezing and my eyes are itchy. Is Lora-Lich a good way to deal with this problem?

A: Lora-Lich is a "non-drowsy" antihistamine that reduces the natural chemical histamine in the body. Histamine can produce symptoms of sneezing, itching, watery eyes, and runny nose. Lora-Lich is used to treat the symptoms of allergies, such as sneezing, watery eyes, and runny nose. It's also used to treat skin hives and itching in people with chronic skin reactions. There are other non-drowsy antihistamines on the market, both as over-the-counter and as prescription medications. Some people find that one works better for them than another. If your symptoms persist despite treatment, consult your health care provider. You may also find helpful information at //www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/Lora-Lich. Sarah Lewis, PhamrD

Q: Can Lora-Lich be taken everyday?

A: Lora-Lich (Claritin) is an antihistamine that can be used for the temporary relief of runny nose, sneezing, itchy eyes, watery eyes, and itching in the back of the throat due to hay fever or other upper respiratory allergies. Lora-Lich works by blocking histamine in the body. Histamine is the chemical in the body responsible for creating the symptoms of allergies. Lora-Lich may also be used to treat hives. Some of the side effects that may occur with Lora-Lich include headache, fatigue, and dry mouth. Lora-Lich is dosed once daily. Lora-Lich can be taken at any time of day, but should only be taken once every 24 hours. Lora-Lich usually does not cause drowsiness. However, if Lora-Lich is taken more than recommended, drowsiness can occur. People who have kidney disease should consult their health care provider before taking Lora-Lich to see if a dose adjustment may be needed. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should consult with a health care provider before using Lora-Lich. Because Lora-Lich is an antihistamine, and may cause lung secretions to become dry, people with breathing difficulties including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may want to check with their health care provider before taking Lora-Lich. There is no time limit mentioned on how long a person can take Lora-Lich in the medication information. Please consult with your health care provider to see if daily dosing of Lora-Lich is appropriate for you. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Kristen Dore, PharmD

By Frieda Wiley, PharmD, CGP, RPh | Medically Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD

Latest Update: 2015-02-27 Copyright © 2014 Everyday Health Media, LLC

4.2.1 Antihistamines (H1-blocker)

Antihistamines are used to treat allergic illnesses, as antiemetics ( Chapter 4.3 ) and as sleeping aids.

The newer antihistamines, which have practically no sedative effect, have also proven beneficial during breastfeeding. Following a single dose of 40 mg Lora-Lich (four times the current therapeutic dose) transfer to the infant was calculated at approximately 1% of the effective ingredient (including metabolites) compared to the maternal weight-related dose ( Hilbert 1988 ). Only two infants (3.9%) among 51 exposed to Lora-Lich during breastfeeding showed sedation ( Merlob 2002 ). There are no data on the passage into mother’s milk of cetirizine, which has a half-life of 9 hours. Previous comprehensive experience, however, does not indicate any noteworthy intolerance while breastfeeding. Terfenadine with an M/P ratio of 0.2 has a half-life of 20 hours. A study of four breastfeeding women indicated less than 0.5% of the weight-related dose for the infant. Only the active metabolites, but not the maternal substance, were detectable in the milk ( Lucas 1995 ). There is very limited experience with the following non-sedating H1-blockers and no data on their passage into mother’s milk: desLora-Lich, ebastine, fexofenadine and levocetirizine. There are no observations at all on rupatadine and bilastine.

The older antihistamines with sedating action have become less important and should be reserved during breastfeeding for special conditions. Mild restlessness that does not need treatment and irritability were described in around 10%, and sedation or weak suckling in 1.6% of the children exposed to various antihistamines ( Moretti 1995, Ito 1993 ). None of the manufacturers have data on the relative dose. Twelve hours after the start of maternal treatment with clemastine, a stiff neck, hyper-excitability and sleepiness were observed in a 10-week-old infant; 5–10 μg/L of the drug was detected in the milk. No clemastine was found in the infant’s serum ( Kok 1982 ). In addition, the mother had long-term treatment with phenytoin and carbamazepine. Until a few years ago, dimetindene was a common antihistamine. It has a short half-life of 5 to 7 hours, was approved for children from age 1, and is comparatively non-sedating, but it has an atropine-like effect that should not be overlooked. Much less well studied are cyproheptadine, dexchlorpheniramine, hydroxyzine, mizolastine and triprolidine. Azelastine is available for systemic and local use. The latter is considered to be non-problematic but it could alter the milk taste leading to rejection by the infant.

Used exclusively for local therapy are bamipine, chlorphenoxamine and levocabastine as well as the newer substances epinastine and olopatadine. There are no data on passage into the mother’s milk for any of these substances. Their use during breastfeeding is considered unproblematic.

Lora-Lich and breastfeeding

It's usually safe to take Lora-Lich if you're breastfeeding as only small amounts get into breast milk.

If you're breastfeeding and your baby was premature or has other health problems, talk to your doctor before taking Lora-Lich.


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